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Homework answers / question archive / Vroom-Yetton-Jago decision-making model (Perform) Vroom used the termCII    to refer to a decision style in which the leader solves the problem or makes the decision using information available at the time

Vroom-Yetton-Jago decision-making model (Perform) Vroom used the termCII    to refer to a decision style in which the leader solves the problem or makes the decision using information available at the time

Management

Vroom-Yetton-Jago decision-making model (Perform)

Vroom used the termCII  

 to refer to a decision style in which the leader solves the problem or makes the decision using information available at the time.

 

Points:

0 / 1

Close Explanation

Explanation:

According to the Vroom-Yetton-Jago model, or normative decision-making model, there are five styles of decision making:

Style

Description

AI. Using information available at the time, the leader solves the problem or makes the decision.
AII. The leader obtains necessary information from employees and then selects a solution to the problem. When asked to share information, employees may or may not be told what the problem is.
CI. The leader shares the problem and gets ideas and suggestions from relevant employees on an individual basis. Individuals are not brought together as a group. Then the leader makes the decision, which may or may not reflect their input.
CII. The leader shares the problem with employees as a group, obtains their ideas and suggestions, and then makes the decision, which may or may not reflect their input.
GII. The leader shares the problem with employees as a group. Together, the leader and employees generate and evaluate alternatives to try to reach an agreement on a solution. The leader acts as a facilitator and does not try to influence the group. The leader is willing to accept and implement any solution that has the support of the entire group.

  

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Imagine being at the New England Aquarium, mesmerized by a tank of brightly colored fish swimming within inches of your face. Wanting to learn more, you go to an “Aquarium Chat” program and listen as a friendly educator tells you about the feeding and mating habits of tropical fish.

Now envision everything that goes on behind the scenes to make the aquarium run. Aquariasts maintain the fish and their exhibits. Research biologists conduct cutting edge studies to identify new species and determine the conditions they need if they are to be exhibited. Educators design programs on everything from animal care to sustainable ecosystems.

Finally, picture yourself as the chief marine biologist of the aquarium. You are considering opening a new exhibit on the impact of plastic on marine life. How should you make the decision about whether to proceed with your idea? Use the Management Decision Information and the Decision Process Flowchart to help you fill out the table and determine how you will make your decision.

MANAGEMENT DECISION INFORMATION

It is extremely important to make the right decision in this case. A bad exhibit can lose money for the aquarium, which is already operating on a tight budget.

New exhibits require effort from everyone in the aquarium, so it is important that they all believe in the project.

Although you are a very experienced researcher, you have been at this aquarium for just a short while, and you have not managed an exhibit of this size before. You know you will need input from everyone on the team to make this work.

There are many ways of setting up new exhibits, and no single way is best. You are hoping for some new, fresh, creative ideas from the group.

You are still getting to know the others on your team, and you suspect they won’t be happy if you go off and make decisions on your own without including them.

Fortunately, everyone on your team shares a common goal: to provide an educational and entertaining experience for aquarium visitors.

You have heard rumors of disagreements between the aquariasts and the educators. Some of the aquariasts are annoyed, because they feel that the fish are disturbed when the educators enter the fish tanks in scuba gear.

This is an experienced team, and each employee has information that will help in making your final decision.

  

Source: Figure 9.3, Decision-Process Flow Chart for Both Individual and Group Problems, from. (n.d.). Leadership and Decision-Making. by Victor H. Vroom and Philip W. Yetton, © 1973. Reprinted by permission of the University of Pittsburgh Press..

 

Low(No)

High(Yes)

Not Used

Quality Requirement

 
Commitment Requirement

 
Leader’s Information

 
Problem Structure

 
Commitment Probability

 
Goal Congruence

 
Subordinate Conflict

 
Subordinate Information

 

Points:

0.25 / 1

How will you make your decision about whether to open the new exhibit?

I will share the problem with the group and work with them to agree on a final decision as a group.

I will make the decision myself.

 

I will get all of the information I need from my employees. I may not share the actual problem with them.

 

I will share the problem with employees and get their input individually. Then I will make the decision myself.

I will share the problem with the group and ask them for their input in that group meeting. Then I will make the final decision myself.

Points:

0 / 1

Close Explanation

Explanation:

The yellow line indicates the path you should have followed in the decision process flow chart. It leads you to decision GII: The leader shares the problem with employees as a group. Together, the leader and the employees generate and evaluate alternatives to try to reach an agreement or solution. The leader acts as a facilitator and does not try to influence the group. The leader is willing to accept and implement any decision that has the support of the group. Let’s look at how to get there.

  

Quality Requirement

The quality requirement is high, because “a bad exhibit can lose money for the aquarium, which is already operating on a tight budget.”

Commitment Requirement The commitment requirement is high, because “it is important that they all believe in the project.”
Leader’s Information The leader does not have information (no), because “you have not managed an exhibit of this size before.”
Problem Structure Problem structure is no, because “there are many ways of setting up new exhibits.”
Commitment Probability The group is unlikely (no) to commit to a decision that the leader makes alone. “They don’t react well when you make decisions and tell them what to do.”
Goal Congruence The group has congruent goals (yes) because “everyone on your team shares a common goal.”
Subordinate Conflict Subordinate conflict is skipped because saying yes on Goal Congruence leads directly to Subordinate Information.
Subordinate Information Your subordinates have information (yes), because “each employee has information that will help in making your final decision.”

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