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Homework answers / question archive / University of Dayton PHL 313 CHAPTER 15 Multiple-Choice Questions 1)Veblen insists that consumers of products make an “invidious comparison” between: Owners and group members Rich and poor Leaders and servants Cheapskates and spendthrifts   For Veblen, the possession of goods becomes a conventional basis of: Harm Pleasure Happiness Reputability                                                           Bell points out that, especially according to a Puritan way of looking at work, in a world of scarcity, there is a “Malthusian” injunction for: Impudence Prudence Waste Inefficiency   Bell insists that the “tradition of the new” encourages: Impudence Prudence Waste Efficiency                                                           Kuttner argues that the impulse toward collective betterment has overwhelmed Americans’    outlook: Socialist Marxist Totalitarian Libertarian   6

University of Dayton PHL 313 CHAPTER 15 Multiple-Choice Questions 1)Veblen insists that consumers of products make an “invidious comparison” between: Owners and group members Rich and poor Leaders and servants Cheapskates and spendthrifts   For Veblen, the possession of goods becomes a conventional basis of: Harm Pleasure Happiness Reputability                                                           Bell points out that, especially according to a Puritan way of looking at work, in a world of scarcity, there is a “Malthusian” injunction for: Impudence Prudence Waste Inefficiency   Bell insists that the “tradition of the new” encourages: Impudence Prudence Waste Efficiency                                                           Kuttner argues that the impulse toward collective betterment has overwhelmed Americans’    outlook: Socialist Marxist Totalitarian Libertarian   6

Philosophy

University of Dayton

PHL 313

CHAPTER 15

Multiple-Choice Questions

1)Veblen insists that consumers of products make an “invidious comparison” between:

    1. Owners and group members
    2. Rich and poor
    3. Leaders and servants
    4. Cheapskates and spendthrifts

 

  1. For Veblen, the possession of goods becomes a conventional basis of:
    1. Harm
    2. Pleasure
    3. Happiness
    4. Reputability

 

  1.                                                         Bell points out that, especially according to a Puritan way of looking at work, in a world of scarcity, there is a “Malthusian” injunction for:
    1. Impudence
    2. Prudence
    3. Waste
    4. Inefficiency

 

  1. Bell insists that the “tradition of the new” encourages:
    1. Impudence
    2. Prudence
    3. Waste
    4. Efficiency

 

  1.                                                         Kuttner argues that the impulse toward collective betterment has overwhelmed Americans’    outlook:
    1. Socialist
    2. Marxist
    3. Totalitarian
    4. Libertarian

 

6.

 

Kuttner argues that America has a periodic romance with a utopian

 

view of:

 

 

a.

Itself

 

b.

The world

 

c.

Laissez-faire

 

d.

Jihad

 

  1.                                                         Heilbroner argues that the source of profits has been constricted by the use of:
    1. Machinery

 

    1. Animals
    2. Capital
    3. “Dead labor”

 

8.

 

Mill is here chiefly concerned with addressing several of the

 

proper limits of:

 

 

a.

Persons

 

b.

The market

 

c.

Educators

 

d.

Government

 

  1.                                                         Some might object to Mill’s argument, he says, that the education of children is one of those expenses that                                                           ought to defray.
    1. the state
    2. parents
    3. welfare
    4. None of the above

 

  1. Marx argues that the “use-value” of a thing comes from its:
    1. Methods
    2. Utility
    3. Means
    4. End

 

  1.                                                         Marx argues that a use-value has value only because this has been embodied in it:
    1. Human labor
    2. Time
    3. Money
    4. Utility

 

  1. The citizen’s guide to supercapitalism would begin by instructing                                       to beware of any advocate who blames corporations for the negative social consequences of supercapitalism.
    1. the public
    2. the government
    3. CEOs
    4. the media

 

  1. What are the two types of “wealth-getting” for Aristotle?
    1. Household management and robbery
    2. Usury and retail trade
    3. Robbery and usury
    4. Household management and retail trade

 

  1. Smith uses the workman example to show what?

 

    1. How many people are needed to make a coat
    2. How the division of labor works to create efficiency
    3. That he is not just writing for aristocrats
    4. To gain confidence from the workingmen of his time

 

  1. What does Keynes believe about the economic status of future generations?
    1. They will have a slightly lower standard of living.
    2. They will have about the same standard of living we have.
    3. They will not have to work hard for a living; the economic problem will be solved.
    4. There will be an economic disaster returning us to the Dark Ages.

 

 

True/False Questions

 

  1. Aristotle thinks that retail trade is an honorable form of wealth-getting.

 

  1. Karl Marx explains the concept of use-value.

 

  1. Mill argues that the government (and not the individual instructor) should determine the curriculum in education.

 

  1. From the viewpoint of Buddhist economics, production from local resources for local needs is the most rational way of economic life.

 

  1. Veblen argues that there is only one incentive for the acquisition and accumulation of wealth.

 

  1. Sen argues that poorer nations must face the hard realities of economics and “pull themselves up by their bootstraps,” as wealthier nations had to do to put themselves in their present position of affluence.

 

  1. Robert Reich believes that corporate executives are engaged in a diabolical plot.

 

  1. The Puritan ethic, according to Bell, might be summed up easily in the phrase “delayed gratification.”

 

  1. Kuttner is searching for the proper understanding of a “mixed” economy.

 

  1. For Adam Smith, the highest value is always economic growth.

 

 

Fill-in-the-Blank Questions

 

  1. Sen argues that, in part because it is so broad,                                  is not suited to solve many problems; the best it can do is anticipate them.

 

  1. The teaching of the Buddha enjoins an attitude of                                     toward both sentient beings and trees.

 

  1. Bell analyzes the cultural                                  of capitalism.

 

  1. For Mill, the ideal of a                                  economic system can also be applied to proper education.

 

  1. In a community where nearly all goods are                                   property, the                             of earning a livelihood is a powerful incentive for the poorer members of the community.

 

  1. Kuttner argues that American                                 has lost its traditional legitimacy.

 

  1. Aristotle argues that                               management is a praiseworthy form of wealth-getting.

 

  1. Smith argues that                                  labor enables us to reach a better standard of living.

 

  1. According to Marx, a                                            is anything that satisfies human wants.

 

  1. Veblen argues that we desire wealth in order to acquire status, and he calls this

                                               consumption.

 

 

 

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