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Homework answers / question archive / CHAPTER 13: A House Divided, 1840-1861   MULTIPLE CHOICE   1)Why did Mississippi politician Jefferson Davis object in the 1850s to the original design of the Statue of Freedom that now adorns the U

CHAPTER 13: A House Divided, 1840-1861   MULTIPLE CHOICE   1)Why did Mississippi politician Jefferson Davis object in the 1850s to the original design of the Statue of Freedom that now adorns the U

History

CHAPTER 13: A House Divided, 1840-1861

 

MULTIPLE CHOICE

 

1)Why did Mississippi politician Jefferson Davis object in the 1850s to the original design of the Statue of Freedom that now adorns the U.S. Capitol dome?

a.

He disliked the fact that the sculptor was a former slave who had won acclaim for his talent, thus suggesting that blacks were as gifted as whites.

b.

The use of a soldier as the key figure made the nation appear too militaristic.

c.

It portrayed “Freedom” as a nude woman, which he saw as inappropriate.

d.

Its use of an ancient Roman liberty cap on “Freedom” raised a touchy matter about slaves’ longing for freedom.

e.

He believed using “freedom” in the statue’s name was a subtle attack on slave states, so he preferred using “justice” instead.

 

 

 

     2.   Why did slavery become more central to American politics in the 1840s?

a.

The Methodist Church, the nation’s largest denomination, called on all its members to free their slaves.

b.

Territorial expansion raised the question of whether new lands should be free or slave.

c.

Members of the abolitionist Republican Party, formed in 1844, insisted on debating slavery.

d.

President John Tyler’s antislavery policies caused a major proslavery backlash led by John C. Calhoun.

e.

As the 1848 constitutional deadline for ending the African slave trade drew near, Americans became obsessed with slavery.

 

 

 

     3.   When Mexico won its independence from Spain in 1821:

a.

it was much smaller in area than the United States at the time.

b.

California became a major American trading partner within half a decade.

c.

California’s Indian population was larger than its non-Indian population.

d.

its leaders founded new missions in California to assure continued Catholic power.

e.

Americans immediately began settling in California in large numbers.

 

 

 

          

 

     4.   American settlement in Texas in the 1820s and 1830s:

a.

took place without approval from the Mexican government.

b.

did not exceed the Mexican population there until the United States annexed Texas in 1845.

c.

led Stephen Austin to demand more autonomy from Mexican officials.

d.

included no slaves, because Mexico had banned slavery in its territory.

e.

was in communities whose American-born residents were called Tejanos by their Mexican neighbors.

 

 

 

          

 

     5.   President Martin Van Buren rejected adding Texas to the United States because:

a.

the Texas Republic’s congress opposed joining the United States, preferring to stay independent.

b.

the Mexican army’s resounding victory at the Alamo made them fearful of antagonizing a powerful government.

c.

the population of Texas was too small to justify it.

d.

Henry Clay wanted to add it and, as the Whig leader, he was their sworn enemy.

e.

the presence of slaves there would reignite the issue of slavery, and they preferred to avoid it.

 

 

 

     6.   Which two political figures agreed to keep the issue of annexing Texas out of the 1844 presidential campaign if possible?

a.

John Tyler and John C. Calhoun.

b.

Henry Clay and Daniel Webster.

c.

Henry Clay and Martin Van Buren.

d.

Henry Clay and James Polk.

e.

Andrew Jackson and John Quincy Adams.

 

 

 

     7.   When Democrats demanded the “reannexation” of Texas in 1844, they:

a.

implied that Texas had once been part of the United States through the Louisiana Purchase.

b.

were consciously appealing to northern Whigs.

c.

were seeking to take the slavery issue out of the presidential campaign.

d.

neglected to say anything about the status of Oregon.

e.

realized their stand would not be very popular in the South.

 

 

 

                                

 

     8.   “Fifty-four forty or fight” referred to demands for American control of:

a.

Texas.

d.

Mexico.

b.

Oregon.

e.

Kansas and Nebraska.

c.

California.

 

 

 

 

     9.   For the South in the 1830s, making the Texas territory part of the United States could potentially be most beneficial in what way?

a.

Texas would enter the Union as a slave state.

b.

The United States would gain valuable oil reserves.

c.

There would be no trading with Mexico.

d.

Texas was mostly dry, so there was little potential in farming.

e.

Several slave states could be created out of Texas.

 

 

 

   10.   When “Fifty-four forty or fight” did not result in gaining all of the Pacific Northwest, who most likely would have been the angriest?

a.

Southern Democrats.

d.

Northern Whigs.

b.

Northern Democrats.

e.

Southern Whigs.

c.

Liberty Party members.

 

 

 

 

 

   11.   As he entered the White House, which of James K. Polk’s goals led to war?

a.

Reducing the tariff.

b.

Settling the slavery dispute.

c.

Obtaining Oregon.

d.

Bringing California into the Union.

e.

Reestablishing the Independent Treasury system.

 

 

 

                                

 

   12.   During the Mexican War:

a.

Mexican troops occupied much of Texas after winning at the Alamo.

b.

the bulk of the fighting occurred in California.

c.

U.S. troops occupied the Mexican capital.

d.

an American revolt in California led briefly to a monarchy.

e.

Whigs strongly supported Polk’s policies.

 

 

 

   13.   Who questioned President Polk’s right to declare war by introducing a resolution to Congress requesting that the president specify the precise spot where blood had first been shed?

a.

Daniel Webster.

d.

Abraham Lincoln.

b.

John C. Calhoun.

e.

Charles Sumner.

c.

Stephen Douglas.

 

 

 

 

   14.   Who wrote On Civil Disobedience as a response to the U.S. war with Mexico?

a.

Abraham Lincoln.

d.

David Wilmot.

b.

Ralph Waldo Emerson.

e.

Henry David Thoreau.

c.

David Walker.

 

 

 

 

          

 

   15.   One aspect of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo of 1848 provided for what?

a.

The transfer of Montana to the United States.

b.

Payment of $15 million to the Mexican citizenry in the United States and Indians but not the Mexican government.

c.

Mexicans to still govern themselves in Texas and New Mexico.

d.

U.S. control of all of the Oregon Country.

e.

Protection of large Mexican landowners in California.

 

 

 

   16.   After gaining its independence, what resulted in the new independent nation of Texas?

a.

Anglos encouraged Tejanos to keep their Mexican customs.

b.

Anglos initially supported Juan Seguín, a Tejano supporter of Texas independence, as mayor of San Antonio.

c.

The Catholic Church lost power in Texas.

d.

All Tejanos refused to send their children to English-speaking schools.

e.

Most Tejanos converted to Protestant faiths.

 

 

 

                                

 

   17.   With the Gadsden Purchase, whose territory increased in size?

a.

Canada.

d.

Nevada.

b.

Mexico.

e.

Texas.

c.

California.

 

 

 

 

                                

 

   18.   Until the 1870s, who in essence controlled the territory between the Nueces River and the Rio Grande?

a.

Apaches.

d.

Spain.

b.

Comanches.

e.

United States.

c.

Mexico.

 

 

 

 

                                

 

   19.   According to John L. O’Sullivan’s Democratic Review, what was the key to the history of nations and the rise and fall of empires?

a.

Race.

d.

Slavery.

b.

Democracy.

e.

Printing.

c.

Economic freedom.

 

 

 

 

   20.   In the first half of the nineteenth century, the United States gained the most territory through:

a.

purchasing territory from Russia.

d.

wars with Mexico.

b.

a treaty with Great Britain.

e.

purchasing territory from Spain.

c.

purchasing territory from France.

 

 

 

 

 

   21.   How did the territory acquired from the Mexican War promote Thomas Jefferson’s earlier idea of an Empire of Liberty?

a.

More land meant more business opportunities.

b.

Only people classified as whites gained full rights.

c.

Desert farming would attract many American settlers.

d.

The national government would have full sovereignty.

e.

Lewis and Clark had explored California more than forty years earlier.

 

 

 

 

   22.   What happened under the constitution of independent Texas?

a.

Slavery was banned.

b.

People of color had had more freedoms and rights when Mexico previously controlled Texas.

c.

Rights and privileges for free blacks expanded.

d.

The government would respect Comanche territory.

e.

Land sales by private sellers were prohibited.

 

 

 

                                

 

   23.   Analyze the role that manifest destiny played in the California gold rush. What was the result?

a.

It led to a diverse group of people migrating to California.

b.

It was God’s will for California to have gold.

c.

The California legislature created a foreign miners’ tax.

d.

The Native American population grew due to the amount of gold.

e.

Californians hid much of their gold, leading to large migrations to Australia.

 

 

 

 

   24.   The California gold rush turned ________ into perhaps the world’s most diverse city.

a.

San Diego

d.

Sacramento

b.

Los Angeles

e.

San Francisco

c.

Malibu

 

 

 

 

   25.   Which of the following statements related to ethnicity was true in California in the 1850s?

a.

Thousands of Indian children were declared orphans and treated as slaves.

b.

The state recognized more than 15,000 African-Americans as slaves of whites who had moved there.

c.

Men of all backgrounds, except those from China, were allowed to vote and serve on juries.

d.

Indian communities prospered by renting land and selling supplies to gold miners.

e.

Wealthy Mexican landowners dominated the new state government and would do so until the 1880s.

 

 

 

   26.   Winning the Mexican War did what in regard to trade for the United States?

a.

Mexico refused to trade with the United States.

b.

Native Americans blocked ports in southern California.

c.

Gaining valuable trade ports tripled trade with China by 1860.

d.

The United States now had to consider going to war with Great Britain for control of the Pacific Coast.

e.

The gold rush lessened the need for trade.

 

 

 

   27.   Which American naval officer negotiated a treaty that opened two Japanese ports to U.S. ships in 1854?

a.

Oliver H. Perry.

d.

Chester Nimitz.

b.

John Paul Jones.

e.

Matthew Perry.

c.

Alfred Mahan.

 

 

 

 

   28.   The opening of Japan to United States trade led to what?

a.

Japan created its own minstrel shows.

b.

Other nations wanted to carve up Japanese territory.

c.

Japan became a modernized military power.

d.

The United States became much less interested in China.

e.

Japan attacked Russia.

 

 

 

   29.   The Wilmot Proviso, admission of California into the Union, and the Missouri Compromise focused on what?

a.

The slaves should be freed immediately.

b.

Popular sovereignty needed to be used.

c.

Ex-slaves should be sent to another part of the world.

d.

A slave should be counted as three-fifths of a person.

e.

The extension of slavery was a volatile issue.

 

 

 

   30.   In 1846, Congressman David Wilmot proposed to:

a.

prohibit slavery from all territory acquired from Mexico.

b.

allow voters to decide the status of slavery in new territories.

c.

divide the Oregon Country between Great Britain and the United States.

d.

annex Cuba to avoid southern secession.

e.

allow slavery to expand into California and New Mexico.

 

 

 

          

 

   31.   The Free Soil Party:

a.

demonstrated that antislavery sentiment had spread far beyond abolitionist ranks.

b.

cost Henry Clay the presidency by siphoning off votes from him in New York.

c.

was powerful enough to convince James Polk not to seek reelection.

d.

strongly opposed the Wilmot Proviso but agreed to let it pass as part of a compromise.

e.

nominated Zachary Taylor for president.

 

 

 

                                

 

   32.   Why was the extension of slavery significant politically?

a.

It determined whether slavery should end everywhere immediately.

b.

Both the North and South wanted to control the Senate.

c.

It led to the United States gaining more territory in the Caribbean.

d.

It gave the abolitionists control of northern politics.

e.

The government mandated that the Methodist church had to be split into two groups.

 

 

 

 

   33.   What occurred in 1848 in Europe?

a.

There were revolutions against monarchies.

b.

The unification of Germany occurred.

c.

Italian kingdoms reunified.

d.

Napoleon escaped, created an army, and attacked England.

e.

The Chartist movement renounced democracy.

 

 

 

   34.   What was a key provision of the Compromise of 1850?

a.

California would enter the Union as a slave state.

b.

Slavery would be abolished in Washington, D.C.

c.

The Oregon Territory would be created.

d.

The Fugitive Slave Act gave runaway slaves more protection and guaranteed them a lawyer in court.

e.

Besides California, other territory acquired from the Mexican-American War would use popular sovereignty to decide about slavery.

 

 

 

   35.   The opponents of the Compromise of 1850:

a.

included key Whig leaders Henry Clay and Daniel Webster.

b.

received a boost from President Zachary Taylor.

c.

were surprised when John C. Calhoun spoke in favor of the Compromise.

d.

argued that California must become a free state, which the Compromise did not allow.

e.

were thrilled to have the support of influential Vice President Millard Fillmore.

 

 

 

   36.   The Fugitive Slave Act of 1850:

a.

won the grudging support of Ralph Waldo Emerson as a necessary compromise.

b.

gave new powers to federal officers to override local law enforcement.

c.

was declared unconstitutional in the Dred Scott case.

d.

angered southerners by weakening an earlier law on fugitive slaves.

e.

convinced Abraham Lincoln to retire briefly from political life.

 

 

 

          

 

   37.   What was ironic about the Fugitive Slave Act?

a.

Only ten slaves were returned to the South.

b.

Abolitionists endorsed this federal legislation.

c.

Ex-slaves who gained their freedom before 1850 resented the law.

d.

The South promoted states’ rights, but with this law agreed to strong federal action.

e.

It resulted in the North and South gaining more respect for each other’s way of life.

 

 

 

 

   38.   What became a key component of the Underground Railroad in the 1850s?

a.

Abolitionists finally agreed to participate in hiding and moving slaves to freedom.

b.

Slave catchers also employed the Underground Railroad to return slaves to the South.

c.

The Erie Canal became the primary means to get slaves to freedom in Canada.

d.

Connections for ships going to Africa were added to the Underground Railroad so that slaves could find a safe refuge among their ancestors.

e.

Trains were used more frequently to take slaves to Canada and freedom.

 

 

 

                                

 

   39.   Stephen Douglas’s motivation for introducing the Kansas-Nebraska Act was to:

a.

boost efforts to build a transcontinental railroad.

b.

spread slavery.

c.

win the position of speaker of the House of Representatives.

d.

pacify southerners who strongly supported the idea of popular sovereignty.

e.

help Franklin Pierce win a second term as president.

 

 

 

                                

 

   40.   Which of the following is an example of the political impact of the Kansas-Nebraska Act?

a.

A strong, united Whig Party won the White House in the next presidential election.

b.

Nearly half of northern Democrats joined the patriotic American Party.

c.

The Whig Party collapsed, and many disgruntled northerners joined the new Republican Party.

d.

Stephen Douglas and Abraham Lincoln decided to become running mates for the presidential election of 1856.

e.

The new Free Soil Party strongly endorsed the Act and won new congressional seats in several Upper South districts.

 

 

 

   41.   From 1848 to 1860, most of the railroad construction was in which region?

a.

Northeast.

d.

Midwest.

b.

Southeast.

e.

West Coast.

c.

Southwest.

 

 

 

 

   42.   What attracted voters to the Know-Nothing Party?

a.

Its desire to dissolve the Missouri Compromise.

b.

Its move to annex Cuba for the expansion of American slavery.

c.

Its call for immediate emancipation of all slaves.

d.

Its opposition to the Dred Scott decision.

e.

Its denunciation of Roman Catholic immigrants.

 

 

 

          

 

   43.   In 1854, the Know-Nothings won all the congressional races as well as the governorship in:

a.

Louisiana.

d.

Massachusetts.

b.

South Carolina.

e.

Georgia.

c.

Ohio.

 

 

 

 

          

 

   44.   Why were the Know-Nothings unable to curb the political influence of Irish immigrants?

a.

The pope interceded on behalf of Catholics in America.

b.

Southern slaveholders protected the rights of immigrants.

c.

The Irish used their strong economic clout to gain political influence.

d.

After arriving in the United States, most of the Irish converted to Protestant faiths.

e.

Voting rights were being determined by race.

 

 

 

 

   45.   In the late 1850s, a white slaveholder living in Mississippi most likely voted for candidates from which political party?

a.

Free Soil.

d.

Whig.

b.

Democratic.

e.

Republican.

c.

American.

 

 

 

 

 

   46.   The Republican Party founded in the 1850s strongly endorsed the same policy about slavery in the territories that ________ had begun advocating in 1846.

a.

David Wilmot

d.

Roger Taney

b.

Stephen Douglas

e.

Henry Clay

c.

John C. Calhoun

 

 

 

 

   47.   The Republican free labor ideology:

a.

convinced northerners that Catholic immigrants posed a more significant threat than the southern slave power.

b.

won Republicans significant support from non-slaveholders in the South in 1856.

c.

owed its origins to Abraham Lincoln’s reemergence in the wake of the Kansas-Nebraska Act.

d.

accepted southerners’ point that slavery protected their liberty, but explained that the economic benefits of free labor would outweigh the damage abolition would do to southern liberty.

e.

led to the argument by William Seward that free labor and slave labor were essentially incompatible.

 

 

 

   48.   The caning of Charles Sumner by Preston Brooks:

a.

showed the extreme violence of which northern abolitionists were capable.

b.

actually helped the new Republican Party.

c.

was denounced by most southerners as barbaric.

d.

occurred because Sumner praised the attack on Lawrence, Kansas.

e.

was unusual because both men were proslavery Democrats.

 

 

 

                                

 

   49.   The Republican presidential candidate in 1856 was:

a.

John Breckinridge.

d.

John C. Frémont.

b.

Abraham Lincoln.

e.

James Buchanan.

c.

Charles Sumner.

 

 

 

 

   50.   The Dred Scott decision of the U.S. Supreme Court:

a.

declared that Congress could not ban slavery from territories.

b.

endorsed the free soil policy of the Republicans.

c.

backed the idea of popular sovereignty.

d.

freed Dred and Harriet Scott.

e.

extended the Missouri Compromise line to California.

 

 

 

                                

 

   51.   On matters related to citizenship, the U.S. Supreme Court declared in Dred Scott that:

a.

free African-Americans could vote.

b.

anyone that a state considered to be a citizen was a U.S. citizen.

c.

freeborn blacks were U.S. citizens, but those born into slavery and later freed could not be citizens.

d.

citizenship was limited to males.

e.

only white persons could be U.S. citizens.

 

 

 

          

 

   52.   The Lecompton Constitution was the:

a.

antislavery constitution adopted in Nebraska.

b.

proslavery constitution proposed for Kansas.

c.

pro-secession constitution of North Carolina.

d.

Missouri constitution preferred by Abraham Lincoln.

e.

compromise offered in 1861 to end the secession crisis.

 

 

 

          

 

   53.   In the 1850s, which action would be in line with Abraham Lincoln’s views on race?

a.

Blacks and whites live harmoniously in the same town.

b.

An African-American man trains as an artisan and then starts his own business.

c.

An African-American man wants the right to vote in Illinois.

d.

African-Americans and whites are equals in the court system.

e.

African-Americans and whites are treated the same in all aspects of the law.

 

 

 

 

   54.   The famous Lincoln-Douglas debates took place during the campaign for:

a.

U.S. president in 1856.

b.

U.S. president in 1860.

c.

governor of Illinois in 1858.

d.

a congressional seat from Illinois in 1856.

e.

U.S. senator from Illinois in 1858.

 

 

 

          

 

   55.   During his debate with Abraham Lincoln in Freeport, Illinois, Stephen Douglas:

a.

called for the free soil principle to determine the status of slavery in the West.

b.

denounced popular sovereignty as a fraud.

c.

praised the temperance movement and other key social reforms.

d.

insisted that popular sovereignty was compatible with the Dred Scott decision.

e.

argued that slaveholders had a constitutional right to take their slaves anywhere.

 

 

 

                                

 

   56.   In the Lincoln-Douglas debates, what view did Stephen Douglas take?

a.

If each state, slave or free, worried only about its own status, then there should be harmony.

b.

Douglas believed that the national government should have the final say on whether a state was slave or free.

c.

If slavery could be extended to the Pacific, then manifest destiny could be achieved.

d.

Douglas stated slavery was wrong but should not be abolished.

e.

Slavery needed to be extended to the West Coast so that a transcontinental railroad could be built.

 

 

 

 

   57.   Who was responsible for the 1856 Pottawatomie Creek Massacre in Kansas and led the raid on the federal arsenal at Harpers Ferry, Virginia, in 1859?

a.

Frederick Douglass.

d.

Henry Ward Beecher.

b.

Joseph Lane.

e.

John Brown.

c.

Robert E. Lee.

 

 

 

 

          

 

   58.   What distinguished John Brown from other abolitionists such as William Lloyd Garrison and Frederick Douglass?

a.

Brown only used religion.

b.

Brown wanted to send ex-slaves abroad.

c.

Brown emphasized violence in freeing slaves.

d.

Brown wanted slaves to be freed immediately.

e.

Brown hoped to see ex-slaves gain equal rights.

 

 

 

 

   59.   Which 1854 document called for the United States to seize Cuba?

a.

The Monroe Doctrine.

d.

The Webster-Ashburton Treaty.

b.

The Ostend Manifesto.

e.

The Frémont Manifesto.

c.

The Wilmot Proviso.

 

 

 

 

   60.   In the 1850s, adventurer William Walker became famous for:

a.

creating a utopian community in northern California.

b.

his proslavery novels that heightened sectionalism.

c.

breeding horses in the West.

d.

leading filibustering expeditions in South America.

e.

defying fellow whites in his native region and becoming a prominent abolitionist.

 

 

 

          

 

   61.   The Democratic Party split in 1860 over the question of whether to:

a.

renominate President James Buchanan for a second term.

b.

protect slavery in the territories or allow popular sovereignty in them.

c.

impeach Chief Justice Roger Taney for the Dred Scott decision.

d.

endorse the acquisition of Cuba by the United States, thus increasing slave territory.

e.

immediately bring Kansas and Nebraska into the Union as slave states.

 

 

 

                                

 

   62.   What key component of the 1860 Republican platform had never before been part of a major party’s platform?

a.

There should be no national banking system.

b.

Slavery should be abolished in the Upper South.

c.

The government needed to protect industry with a tariff.

d.

Federal money should be used to improve and extend transportation.

e.

Slavery should not be extended into new states and territories.

 

 

 

 

   63.   In the 1860 election, who was the presidential candidate to have significant support in all parts of the country?

a.

Abraham Lincoln.

d.

Stephen Douglas.

b.

John Breckinridge.

e.

Will Seward.

c.

John Bell.

 

 

 

 

          

 

   64.   By casting their ballots for the Constitutional Unionist candidate John Bell in the 1860 election, what did people in Virginia and Kentucky fear?

a.

These voters were afraid that the South would not secede.

b.

These voters feared that northern industrialists controlled too much of the economy.

c.

The voters did not want South Carolina to take the lead in creating a new government.

d.

The voters worried that an impending civil war would lead to war being fought in their respective states.

e.

The voters worried that if Stephen Douglas was elected, slavery would be eliminated immediately.

 

 

 

 

   65.   In 1860, which state became the first to pass an ordinance of secession and declare itself separated from the Union?

a.

Virginia.

d.

South Carolina.

b.

Kentucky.

e.

Tennessee.

c.

Georgia.

 

 

 

 

   66.   During the secession winter of 1860–1861, who offered the most widely supported compromise plan in Congress, which allowed the westward extension of the Missouri Compromise line?

a.

Abraham Lincoln.

d.

Zachary Taylor.

b.

John Crittenden.

e.

Andrew Johnson.

c.

Jefferson Davis.

 

 

 

 

   67.   The American Civil War began in April 1861, when:

a.

Confederate forces fired upon and captured Fort Sumter.

b.

U.S. naval vessels bombarded the city of Wilmington, North Carolina.

c.

Confederate and Union cavalry clashed in disputed territory in Texas.

d.

General William Sherman led Union soldiers on a devastating march through Georgia.

e.

Confederate infantry attacked Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.

 

 

 

   68.   Analyzing the maneuvering of Jefferson Davis and Abraham Lincoln around Fort Sumter, who was superior?

a.

Davis gained the most essential fort in the South.

b.

Lincoln was too weak-willed to be president.

c.

Lincoln failed to walk the tightrope.

d.

Lincoln made the South look like the aggressor.

e.

Davis was able to prevent a northern invasion of the Confederacy for two years.

 

 

 

MATCHING

 

TEST 1

 

Match the person or term with the with the correct description.

 

a.

On Civil Disobedience

b.

1848 Free Soil presidential candidate

c.

author of the Kansas-Nebraska Act

d.

tried to attach bill to war declaration to ban slavery

e.

author of the Compromise of 1850

f.

caned Charles Sumner

g.

a slave who sued for his freedom

h.

led a raid on Harpers Ferry

i.

1860 Republican presidential candidate

j.

1860 southern Democratic presidential candidate

k.

1856 Republican presidential candidate

l.

filibustering

 

 

     1.   Dred Scott

 

     2.   Abraham Lincoln

 

     3.   John C. Frémont

 

     4.   Martin Van Buren

 

     5.   John Brown

 

     6.   William Walker

 

     7.   Henry David Thoreau

 

     8.   John Breckinridge

 

     9.   Stephen Douglas

 

   10.   Henry Clay

 

   11.   Preston Brooks

 

   12.   David Wilmot

 

       

 

TEST 2

 

Match the person or term with the with the correct description.

 

a.

issued by antislavery congressmen

b.

suggested that the United States buy or seize Cuba

c.

returned runaway slaves to their master

d.

America’s mission to settle the West

e.

Texas borderland

f.

sudden increase in California’s population

g.

voided the Missouri Compromise

h.

no slavery in land acquired by Mexico

i.

expedition to Central America

j.

opponents to the expansion of slavery

k.

anti-immigrant political group

l.

California’s entry into the Union as a free state

 

 

   13.   manifest destiny

 

   14.   Wilmot Proviso

 

   15.   Kansas-Nebraska Act

 

   16.   Fugitive Slave Act

 

   17.   Ostend Manifesto

 

   18.   Free Soil Party

 

   19.   Compromise of 1850

 

   20.   Know-Nothing Party

 

   21.   Tejanos

 

   22.   appeal of the Independent Democrats

 

   23.   filibustering

 

   24.   gold rush

 

       

 

TRUE/FALSE

 

     1.   The Texas independence movement was sparked in part because the Mexican government, alarmed that its grip on the area was weakening, annulled existing land contracts and barred future emigration from the United States in 1830.

 

 

     2.   James K. Polk had been Andrew Jackson’s vice president.

 

 

     3.   The issue of Texas annexation was closely linked to slavery and affected the nominations of presidential candidates in the 1840s.

 

 

     4.   The Mexican War was the first American war to be fought primarily on foreign soil.

 

 

          

 

     5.   In California after the Mexican-American War, landowners of Spanish heritage had to adjust to a new identity as if they were immigrants.

 

 

     6.   After Texas independence, the Tejanos lost rights and access to land.

 

 

                                

 

     7.   The explosive population growth and competition for gold brought cooperation among California’s many racial and ethnic groups as they worked together for wealth.

 

 

     8.   As it divided over the issue of slavery, the Catholic Church broke into a northern and southern branch.

 

 

          

 

     9.   The Wilmot Proviso never passed as a law.

 

 

   10.   The Free Soil idea in the West appealed to racist northerners who worried about competing against black laborers.

 

 

                                

 

   11.   The movements against European monarchies in 1848 were successful in their attempts to create more democracy.

 

 

                                

 

   12.   The Fugitive Slave Act provided for the return of runaway slaves to their owners.

 

 

          

 

   13.   The Appeal of the Independent Democrats was not a very effective piece of political persuasion.

 

 

          

 

   14.   The development of railroads and economic integration of the Northeast and Northwest created the groundwork for the political unification of the Republican Party.

 

 

   15.   Nativism emerged as a major political movement in 1854 with the sudden appearance of the Liberty Party.

 

 

   16.   The free labor ideology was based on the assumption that free labor could not compete with slave labor and so slavery’s expansion had to be halted to ensure freedom for the white laborer.

 

 

                                

 

   17.   Prior to becoming president in 1857, James Buchanan did not have much political experience.

 

 

          

 

   18.   Moderate Republicans like Abraham Lincoln supported the Dred Scott decision.

 

 

 

   19.   Abraham Lincoln opposed increasing economic opportunities for free blacks.

 

 

   20.   The Lincoln-Douglas debates were relatively insignificant in American political history and of little consequence to the outcome of the U.S. senate race.

 

 

   21.   John Brown perpetuated violence over the slavery issue in only Virginia.

 

 

          

 

   22.   The Ostend Manifesto suggested seizing all of Mexico, rather than just the Mexican Cession, during the Mexican War.

 

 

   23.   Abraham Lincoln won the 1860 presidential election without a single electoral vote in ten southern states.

 

 

          

 

   24.   By the time Lincoln actually took the oath of office, seven states had already seceded from the Union.

 

 

 

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