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Homework answers / question archive / Chapter 10—The Rise of a New Nation, 1815-1836   MULTIPLE CHOICE       1)   Which statement best describes the effect of the Hartford Convention? a

Chapter 10—The Rise of a New Nation, 1815-1836   MULTIPLE CHOICE       1)   Which statement best describes the effect of the Hartford Convention? a

History

Chapter 10—The Rise of a New Nation, 1815-1836

 

MULTIPLE CHOICE

 

    1)   Which statement best describes the effect of the Hartford Convention?

a.

Federalists were regarded as heroes for having shown the dangers of a government dominated by one party.

b.

New England Federalists were regarded as traitors for threatening to secede at a time when America seemed poised for victory.

c.

Republicans were regarded as a party of tyranny because they insisted on two terms for their presidents.

d.

Republicans were regarded as heroes for having preserved the principle of checks and balances.

 

 

 

     2.   All of the following were goals of Henry Clay's "American System," EXCEPT:

a.

the creation of a national market economy.

b.

regional specializations that would foster trade.

c.

the creation of a nationally homogenous economy in which regional distinctions disappeared.

d.

economic independence from Europe.

 

 

 

     3.   To promote American industry, Republicans after the War of 1812 advocated

a.

removing the ban on slave labor in factories.

b.

reducing federal taxes on business.

c.

raising the prices of foreign goods through high tariffs.

d.

reducing regulations to free businesses from unnecessary paperwork.

 

 

 

     4.   The man who introduced legislation chartering the Second Bank of the United States in 1816 was

a.

Henry Clay.

b.

John C. Calhoun.

c.

James Madison.

d.

Andrew Jackson.

 

 

 

     5.   The easiest way to move goods in the West following the War of 1812 was by

a.

road.

b.

water.

c.

rail.

d.

None were acceptable solutions.

 

 

 

     6.   Which statement about the Cumberland Road is most accurate?

a.

It showed that the private sector could meet America's transportation needs.

b.

It solved the problem of east-west transportation.

c.

It received a federal subsidy.

d.

The War Department pledged it would not be used by the military.

 

 

 

     7.   The Erie Canal linked the Great Lakes with

a.

Buffalo.

b.

the St. Lawrence River.

c.

New York City.

d.

The Cumberland Road.

 

 

 

     8.   The Erie Canal was funded

a.

privately.

b.

with foreign investments.

c.

with state-issued bonds.

d.

with federal revenues.

 

 

 

     9.   In the cases of Dartmouth College v. Woodward, McCulloch v. Maryland, and Gibbons v. Ogden, the Supreme Court

a.

strengthened the power of the federal government at the expense of the states.

b.

rejected a laissez-faire position with regard to business.

c.

declared federal legislation unconstitutional.

d.

affirmed that the public good outweighs the needs of private business.

 

 

 

   10.   Shortly after the War of 1812, the American Navy

a.

defeated a British attempt to re-institute impressment.

b.

suffered a humiliating defeat at the hands of the French.

c.

put an end to attacks by Barbary pirates.

d.

was virtually decommissioned.

 

 

 

   11.   The Rush-Bagot Agreement

a.

ended the practice of impressment.

b.

compensated Americans for British attacks during the War of 1812.

c.

allowed Americans to trade in the British West Indies.

d.

set the border between the United States and Canada.

 

 

   12.   In the Adams-Onìs Treaty (1819)

a.

the United States acquired the Oregon Territory.

b.

the United States received all of Florida in exchange for releasing Spain from a $5 million dollar damage claim resulting from border raids.

c.

the United States won official recognition from Great Britain.

d.

the United States surrendered its claim on Quebec.

 

 

 

   13.   Which statement best describes the Monroe Doctrine?

a.

It was extremely unpopular among Americans.

b.

It invited Europeans to be partners in keeping peace in the western hemisphere.

c.

It was an attempt to continue Spanish control of Latin America.

d.

It relied upon the British desire to prevent new colonies in the New World.

 

 

 

   14.   The primary cause of the Panic of 1819 was

a.

a glut of gold and silver, which drove prices down.

b.

the federal government's overregulation of the economy.

c.

a sharp decline in the price of slaves.

d.

speculation.

 

 

   15.   Northerners finally succeeded in passing a greatly increased tariff by

a.

promising to support southern efforts to increase cotton exports.

b.

threatening to cut off funding for projects in other parts of the country.

c.

cutting internal taxes.

d.

making deals with western Congressmen.

 

 

 

   16.   What did the Tallmadge Amendment propose?

a.

That Missouri be admitted as a free state

b.

That the national bank be eliminated

c.

To purchase Texas from Mexico

d.

That slavery be prohibited in any new territories

 

 

 

   17.   All of the following is true about the Missouri Compromise, EXCEPT:

a.

Missouri was admitted as a slave state.

b.

Slavery was banned forever in the Louisiana Territory above 36 30' north latitude.

c.

Maine was admitted as a free state.

d.

It established that future territories would decide on the issue of slavery by popular sovereignty.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   18.   In the election of 1824, the Republican party caucus nominated William Crawford because

a.

Crawford opposed the American System.

b.

the party disliked James Madison, who supported John Quincy Adams.

c.

Crawford was a southerner.

d.

the party feared the influence of Andrew Jackson.

 

 

 

   19.   In the election of 1824, Henry Clay supported

a.

fellow southerner, Andrew Jackson.

b.

Martin Van Buren.

c.

Georgia's William Crawford.

d.

John Quincy Adams.

 

 

 

   20.   John Quincy Adams had trouble creating strong support for his government because

a.

he alienated northerners trying to win support in the South, where he was distrusted.

b.

he opposed slavery.

c.

he refused to use political favors to win support.

d.

he believed that the government should keep tariffs low.

 

 

 

   21.   What was the most profound change to take place in the American political scene by 1830?

a.

The development of a multi-party political system

b.

The elimination of property qualifications for voting in most states

c.

Rewarding political supporters with government jobs

d.

Political candidates emerging from the ranks of average citizens.

 

 

   22.   The key figure behind the creation of the Democratic Party in 1826 was

a.

John Quincy Adams.

b.

Martin Van Buren.

c.

Henry Clay.

d.

DeWitt Clinton.

 

 

 

   23.   The passage of the Tariff of Abominations illustrates the growing influence of

a.

southern cotton growers.

b.

New England ship owners.

c.

western grain growers.

d.

northeastern manufacturers.

 

 

 

   24.   Which statement best describes the economic changes that were taking place in the years between 1800 and 1830?

a.

A smaller proportion of the population owned farms.

b.

There was a substantial increase in property ownership.

c.

Manufacturing came to dominate the economy.

d.

Wage labor was rapidly displacing slave labor in the South.

 

 

 

   25.   Martin Van Buren's "Bucktail" faction came to power in part by

a.

running as supporters of Federalism.

b.

presenting themselves as gentlemen and counting on voters to show deference.

c.

appealing to New York's growing African American population.

d.

using political patronage to reward its supporters.

 

 

 

   26.   In the election of 1828, Jackson supporters ridiculed incumbent John Quincy Adams as

a.

incompetent.

b.

lazy.

c.

lacking in religious virtue.

d.

cold, aristocratic, and corrupt.

 

 

 

   27.   The Democrats based their campaign in 1828 on

a.

increasing tariffs.

b.

restricting immigration.

c.

increasing industrial growth.

d.

reducing the influence of the federal government.

 

 

   28.   How did Andrew Jackson treat the federal bureaucracy?

a.

He respected the men whom previous presidents had appointed and left them in place.

b.

He got rid of entrenched bureaucrats and replaced them with honest men without regard to partisanship.

c.

He distributed government jobs to loyal party members.

d.

He sold offices to the highest bidder.

 

 

   29.   Andrew Jackson opposed the Second Bank of the United States because he

a.

had no authority to control the institution.

b.

claimed the bank used its power to support his opponents.

c.

drew much of his political support from economic speculators who did not want centralized control of the economy.

d.

considered it a tool to benefit the wealthy.

 

 

 

   30.   In contrast to his predecessors, Andrew Jackson

a.

did not seek the advice of his cabinet and instead relied on informal advisors, the so-called "Kitchen-Cabinet".

b.

readily acknowledged the equal distribution of power among the three branches of government.

c.

trusted his associates blindly.

d.

showed much deference to the judiciary.

 

 

   31.   How did Andrew Jackson propose dealing with the government's western lands?

a.

He tried to keep them as cheap as possible to assist small farmers.

b.

He kept prices high for fear that too many people would migrate west.

c.

He proposed a Homestead Act that gave 160 acres of land to anyone who would settle on it for five years.

d.

He raised prices on land to pay for the government-subsidized canals and roads he favored.

 

 

 

   32.   During the 1820s, federal policy toward Indians

a.

distinguished between "savage" and "civilized" Indians.

b.

encouraged them to accept the ways of whites and become integrated into American society.

c.

was based on the assumption that "the only good Indian is a dead Indian."

d.

was designed to get them to give up their lands.

 

 

   33.   Which statement best describes Presidents John Quincy Adams and Andrew Jackson's views on treaties with Indians.

a.

Adams paid lip service to their sanctity; Jackson considered them absurd.

b.

Adams brought to them a lawyer's zeal for finding loopholes; Jackson was a simple farmer who wanted to follow the law as written.

c.

Although they had different experiences, each respected Indians enough to insist on honorably upholding what was written.

d.

Neither considered Indian treaties worth the paper on which they were written.

 

 

 

   34.   Which of the following was not known as one of the Five Civilized Tribes?

a.

Cherokees

b.

Seminoles

c.

Choctaws

d.

Shoshones

 

 

 

   35.   The Georgia legislature annulled the Cherokee constitution in 1829 because

a.

the state wanted to seize the recently discovered gold fields on Cherokee land.

b.

other Indian tribes in the state objected to the preferential treatment given to the Cherokees.

c.

whites considered the Cherokee political system a barrier to Indian removal.

d.

the federal government ordered the move.

 

 

 

   36.   Marshall's ruling in Worcester v. Georgia (1832) failed to help the Cherokee because

a.

the court also ruled that the Cherokees had to settle the matter with Georgia, with no assistance from the federal government.

b.

Jackson refused to use federal force to enforce the ruling.

c.

the court refused to grant the Cherokees sovereign status.

d.

Georgia used the doctrine of nullification to have the ruling vacated.

 

 

   37.   Which of the following is not true about the Cherokee Indians in the 1820s?

a.

They had created a bicameral legislature.

b.

Their political modernization and assimilation gained them the acceptance of their white neighbors.

c.

Their government had a professional salaried civil service.

d.

Its constitution was modeled after that of the United States.

 

 

 

   38.   The Tariff of Abominations angered southerners because

a.

it challenged the legitimacy of slavery.

b.

the South got few rewards from the high tariffs.

c.

it was passed by northern congressmen over Jackson's veto.

d.

Britain retaliated by taxing imported cotton.

 

 

 

   39.   John C. Calhoun's arguments in favor of nullification were awkward because

a.

he was from Massachusetts.

b.

he had helped steer the bill through Congress initially.

c.

he was Jackson's vice-president.

d.

he generally supported federal involvement in the economy.

 

 

 

   40.   What conflict of long-range consequences did the nullification crisis highlight?

a.

Federal versus states' rights

b.

Executive versus legislative authority

c.

The president's right to conduct limited wars without approval from Congress

d.

The eventual battle for the elimination of all tariffs in the 1860s

 

 

ESSAY

 

   41.   Describe the basic economic issues in America following the War of 1812.

 

   42.   How did Andrew Jackson change the role of the presidency?

 

   43.   In what ways did efforts to get Indian land in the 1820s and 1830s continue earlier patterns, and in what ways were they something different?

 

 

   44.   Describe the transportation revolution in the United States in the early nineteenth century.

 

 

   45.   In what ways does Andrew Jackson's battle with the Bank of the United States reflect a commitment to an egalitarian society? In what ways does it reflect a desire to replace one set of elites with another?

 

   46.   Students should examine the contradictory premise on which federal Indian policy was based.

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