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Homework answers / question archive / a clause in Article I, Section 4 of the Constitution requiring each state to recognize the official documents and civil judgments rendered by the courts of other states a landmark Supreme Court case decided in 1824 in which the Court interpreted very broadly the clause in Article I, Section 8 of the Constitution giving Congress the power to regulate interstate commerce, encompassing virtually every form of commercial activity; the commerce clause has been the constitutional basis for much of Congress's regulation of the economy powers of the national government that go beyond those enumerated in the Constitution; the Constitution states that Congress has the power to "make all laws necessary and proper for carrying into execution" the powers enumerated in Article I (see also McCulloch v

a clause in Article I, Section 4 of the Constitution requiring each state to recognize the official documents and civil judgments rendered by the courts of other states a landmark Supreme Court case decided in 1824 in which the Court interpreted very broadly the clause in Article I, Section 8 of the Constitution giving Congress the power to regulate interstate commerce, encompassing virtually every form of commercial activity; the commerce clause has been the constitutional basis for much of Congress's regulation of the economy powers of the national government that go beyond those enumerated in the Constitution; the Constitution states that Congress has the power to "make all laws necessary and proper for carrying into execution" the powers enumerated in Article I (see also McCulloch v

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  1. a clause in Article I, Section 4 of the Constitution requiring each state to recognize the official documents and civil judgments rendered by the courts of other states
  2. a landmark Supreme Court case decided in 1824 in which the Court interpreted very broadly the clause in Article I, Section 8 of the Constitution giving Congress the power to regulate interstate commerce, encompassing virtually every form of commercial activity; the commerce clause has been the constitutional basis for much of Congress's regulation of the economy
  3. powers of the national government that go beyond those enumerated in the Constitution; the Constitution states that Congress has the power to "make all laws necessary and proper for carrying into execution" the powers enumerated in Article I (see also McCulloch v. Maryland, elastic clause, and enumerated powers)
  4. the workings of the federal system, itself - the entire set of interactions among national, state and local governments
  5.  (n.) support for government from the electorate - the authority bestowed on a government or other body by an electoral victory, effectively authorizing it to carry out the policies for which it campaigned; (v.) to make something mandatory, to require or order something by making it mandatory; a federal legislative requirement that states take a particular action, such as requiring that public schools include special educational programs for disadvantaged and/or disabled students
  6. an 1819 Supreme Court decision that established the supremacy of the national government over state governments. In deciding this case, Chief Justice John Marshall and his colleagues held that Congress had certain implied powers in addition to the enumerated powers found in the Constitution
  7. a clause in Article IV, section 2 of the Constitution, according citizens of each state most of the privileges of citizens of other states
  8. federal grants given for specific purposes and awarded on the basis of the merits of applications; a type of the categorical grants available to states and localities
  9. Article VI of the Constitution, which makes the Constitution, national laws, and treaties supreme over state laws when the national government is acting within its constitutional limits
  10. the constitutional amendment stating that "The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the states, are reserved to the states respectively, or to the people."

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