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Homework answers / question archive / LAB 11 - ciLisp Final Project COMP-232 Programming Languages TASK 4 SUMMARY In this task, you will: Implement the rand, read, equal, less, greater and print functions

LAB 11 - ciLisp Final Project COMP-232 Programming Languages TASK 4 SUMMARY In this task, you will: Implement the rand, read, equal, less, greater and print functions

Computer Science

LAB 11 - ciLisp Final Project

COMP-232 Programming Languages

TASK 4

SUMMARY

In this task, you will:

  • Implement the rand, read, equal, less, greater and print functions.
  • Implement conditionals (CI Lisp's equivalent of the ternary operator)

FUNCTION SPECIFICATIONS

The functions will will work as follows:

  • rand o no arguments o generates and returns random double from 0 to 1 o You may use C's rand function (which has "limited randomness", i.e. if left unseeded it will output the same sequence of values on every run), but you must normalize the answer to be between 0 and 1 exactly. o man rand to learn more o If you use the rand function without seeding, and you normalize properly, then your sample run's rand outputs will match those below.

           read

  • No arguments. o          Prints read :: to the stdout, and gets the user's response from the read_target file.
  • The read_target is already set up for you; it is declared in the header file and initialized in the main.
    • If you enter a second argument in the run configurations, it will be used as a file path to open the read_target.
    • If no second argument is provided, the read_target will be the console, so these inputs will be typed by hand (as was done in the sample runs).
  • If the user's response is an integer or double literal, as defined by CI Lisp's grammar, read returns the corresponding duck-typed number.
  • If the user's response is not a valid CILisp number literal, read should print a warning and return NAN_RET_VAL.
  • equal, less, greater o          Binary.
    • Return an integer with value 1 if the condition holds (i.e. if the first argument is equal to, less than, greater than the second respectively). returns an int with value 0 otherwise.
    • 1 is "true" and 0 is "false".
    • equal should ignore type, and should only check if the two numbers' stored values are exactly equal; no error threshold for floating point rounding errors should be used.
  • print o Unary. o Evaluates its operand. o Prints the result of evaluation with printRetVal, and then returns it. o This should be very simple, as printRetVal is already implemented.

CONDITIONAL SPECIFICATIONS

The conditional operator will require adding the following to the grammar:

s_expr ::= ( COND s_expr s_expr s_expr )

 

COND ::= "cond"

 

You'll also need to add several more functions to the FUNC tokenization definition, the FUNC_TYPE enum and funcNames array.

Conditionals can be implemented via adding a new AST_NODE_TYPE member and corresponding struct, and integrating this new type into the AST_NODE. Do not implmenet conditionals by adding a new function instead; syntax errors should be thrown if a conditional doesn't have exactly 3 s_exprs.

 

If the first of the three s_expr (the condition) is nonzero (i.e. "true") when evaluated, then the conditional returns the value of the second s_expr. Otherwise, the condition is zero (i.e. "false") so the third s_expr's value is returned.

 

If A, B and C are expressions, then CI Lisp's ( cond A B C ) is the equivalent of A ? B : C in C (the ternary operator).

SAMPLE RUN

The inputs for the sample run are provided in the task 4 sample input. It demonstrates the new functionality in very simple inputs, and tests some of the old functionality. As always, you should construct better test inputs to ensure that the new functionality is fully integrated with the old. A file is also provided for read inputs which matches those in this run; running with this file as the read_target will lead to the same outputs (but it won't be quite as pretty).

Make sure you understand why each value is printed in the sample run. Note that the result of the full program evaluation is always printed, so the last printed value following each input is not from a call to the print function, but from the printRetVal calls in the .y file, in the program productions. The last two inputs (not including the quit) in the sample run provide an opportunity to test specifications from task 2 which are often overlooked:

  • In the second to last input, if x's value changes between first two prints, then variable evaluation is not being done as specified. The value stored in the symbol table should be replaced with an AST_NODE of type NUMBER_NODE_TYPE housing an AST_NUMBER the first time x is evaluated, so the second evaluation of x should not run the rand function again. The third printed value below is, of course, the result of the entire expression, which is (add x x).

 

  • Similarly, in the last input, while x and y are both accessed twice, there is only a single read call for each one; if x's definition is left as a function node containing a read call after the first evaluation, then read will be incorrectly called a second time for x, but if x's definition is replaced with a numerical value the first time it is accessed, then the second access simply gets this numerical value. The same applies to y. As such, the last input should do two reads (one for x and one for y), not four reads.

 

> (print)

WARNING: print called with no operands!

Double : nan

 

> (print 1) Integer : 1

Integer : 1

 

> (print 1 2)

WARNING: print called with extra (ignored) operands!

Integer : 1

Integer : 1

 

> (add 1 (print 2) )

Integer : 2

Integer : 3

 

> (rand)

Double : 0.000008

 

> (rand)

Double : 0.131538

 

> (rand)

Double : 0.755605

 

> (rand)

Double : 0.458650

 

> (rand)

Double : 0.532767

 

> (rand)

Double : 0.218959

 

> (rand)

Double : 0.047045

 

> (rand)

Double : 0.678865

 

> (rand)

Double : 0.679296

 

> (rand)

Double : 0.934693

 > (read) read :: 1 Integer : 1

 > (read) read :: asdf

WARNING: Invalid read entry! NAN returned!

Double : nan

 > (read) read :: .5

WARNING: Invalid read entry! NAN returned!

Double : nan

 > (read) read :: -5.5

Double : -5.500000

 

> (add (read) (read)) read :: 10 read :: -10 Integer : 0

 

> (equal 0 0)

Integer : 1

 

> (equal 0 0.0)

Integer : 1

 

> (equal 0 0.0001)

Integer : 0

 

> (less 0 0)

Integer : 0

 

> (less -1 0)

Integer : 1

 

> (less 0 -0.00001)

Integer : 0

 

> (greater 0 1)

Integer : 0

 

> (greater 1 0)

Integer : 1

 

> (greater 0 0.0)

Integer : 0

 

> ( ( let (x 0) (y 1) ) (less x y) )

Integer : 1

 

> (cond 0 5 6)

Integer : 6

 

> (cond 1 5 6)

Integer : 5

 

> (cond (less 0 1) 5 6)

Integer : 5

 

> (cond (less 1 0) 5 6)

Integer : 6

 

> ( ( let (x (read)) (y (read)) ) (add (print x) (print x) (print y) (print y)) ) read :: -17.2 Double : -17.200000 Double : -17.200000 read :: +127 Integer : 127

Integer : 127

Double : 219.600000

 

> ( ( let (x (rand)) ) (add (print x) (print x) ) )

Double : 0.383502

Double : 0.383502

Double : 0.767004

 

> quit

 

Process finished with exit code 0

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