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Homework answers / question archive / University of Dayton PHL 313 CHAPTER 13 Multiple-Choice Questions 1)Ciulla argues that the failings of brilliant leaders—such as not listening to others or taking basic precautions—is shown by the story of: Norman Vincent Peale Machiavelli Cesare Borgia Magellan   Ciulla argues that American writers used to pay more attention to the moral virtues of leaders than to: Their personality traits Their victories and successes Their hopes and dreams Their ethical qualities   Ciulla argues that the point of studying leadership is to answer which question? What is bad leadership? Do we need leaders? How should I lead? What is good leadership?   According to Machiavelli, when “a Prince is with his army, and has many soldiers under his command,” he needs a certain reputation to keep his command together

University of Dayton PHL 313 CHAPTER 13 Multiple-Choice Questions 1)Ciulla argues that the failings of brilliant leaders—such as not listening to others or taking basic precautions—is shown by the story of: Norman Vincent Peale Machiavelli Cesare Borgia Magellan   Ciulla argues that American writers used to pay more attention to the moral virtues of leaders than to: Their personality traits Their victories and successes Their hopes and dreams Their ethical qualities   Ciulla argues that the point of studying leadership is to answer which question? What is bad leadership? Do we need leaders? How should I lead? What is good leadership?   According to Machiavelli, when “a Prince is with his army, and has many soldiers under his command,” he needs a certain reputation to keep his command together

Philosophy

University of Dayton

PHL 313

CHAPTER 13

Multiple-Choice Questions

1)Ciulla argues that the failings of brilliant leaders—such as not listening to others or taking basic precautions—is shown by the story of:

    1. Norman Vincent Peale
    2. Machiavelli
    3. Cesare Borgia
    4. Magellan

 

  1. Ciulla argues that American writers used to pay more attention to the moral virtues of leaders than to:
    1. Their personality traits
    2. Their victories and successes
    3. Their hopes and dreams
    4. Their ethical qualities

 

  1. Ciulla argues that the point of studying leadership is to answer which question?
    1. What is bad leadership?
    2. Do we need leaders?
    3. How should I lead?
    4. What is good leadership?

 

  1. According to Machiavelli, when “a Prince is with his army, and has many soldiers under his command,” he needs a certain reputation to keep his command together. He needs a reputation for:
    1. Morality
    2. Cruelty
    3. Kindness
    4. “The Beast”

 

  1. Ciulla argues that hypocrites are:
    1. Always liars
    2. Not always liars
    3. The worst sort of liars
    4. Failed liars

 

  1. Is it better to be loved or feared, according to Machiavelli, and why?
    1. Feared, because that depends on the Prince alone
    2. Loved, because that depends on the Prince and the people
    3. Feared, because that depends on the Prince and the people
    4. Loved, because that depends on the Prince alone

 

  1. Ciulla writes that Cesare Borgia “got the job done.” The way he did it, she says, was:

 

    1. Through personality pizzazz
    2. Through moral consistency
    3. Morally repugnant
    4. Effective and ethical

 

  1. Ciulla argues that there are some areas, “such as                                 ,” in which leaders have to be more meticulous than ordinary people.
    1. moral consistency
    2. family devotion
    3. personality pizzazz
    4. minimal ethics

 

  1. Ciulla specifically writes that leaders sometimes come to think that they are exceptions to the:
    1. Followers
    2. “Average run of things”
    3. Rule
    4. Moral universe

 

  1. Gini says that followers must:
    1. Fear their leader
    2. Share their leader’s purposes and goals
    3. Obey their leader unquestioningly
    4. Treat their leader as “lord of the manor”

 

  1. “Bathsheba syndrome” is what happens when:
    1. Desperation leads one to ethical failure
    2. Success leads one to ethical failure
    3. Unethical behavior leads one to success
    4. Unethical behavior is discovered and punished

 

  1. Ludwig and Longenecker argue that the setup for ethical failure of a leader begins by:
    1. A leader not being where he or she is supposed to be
    2. A leader making a grave moral mistake
    3. A single lie by a leader
    4. Lack of compassion by a leader

 

  1. Ludwig and Longenecker write specifically that success can bring with it some very negative:
    1. Emotional baggage
    2. Financial consequences
    3. Followers
    4. Self-knowledge

 

  1. The test of a servant-leader is whether:
    1. The team meets its goals

 

    1. The followers enjoy being led
    2. Those being served grow as persons
    3. The followers obey the leader

 

  1. Martha Stewart’s “expert power” established her:
    1. Aesthetic
    2. Leadership
    3. Tasteful lifestyle
    4. Cultural authority

 

 

True/False Questions

 

  1. Ciulla argues that the issue with ethical standards and leaders is not that leaders should be held to a higher moral standard than the rest of us, but that they should be held to the same standards as the rest of us.

 

  1. Ciulla worries that when a leader’s moral convictions are too strong, the leader’s effectiveness (and even that leader’s ethics) can be undermined.

 

  1. Machiavelli points out that there are two ways of contending: one in accordance with the laws, and the other by force.

 

  1. Like Machiavelli, Plato admits that a good leader or “true ruler” will also naturally seek his own advantage in choosing to lead.

 

  1. Machiavelli and Lao Tzu agree on all points regarding leadership.

 

  1. Lao Tzu argues that pride—even, if necessary, arrogance—is the chief virtue for a leader.

 

  1. Gini argues that the sole aim of any leader is the acquisition of personal power.

 

  1. Twentieth-century business leaders are often celebrated more for their charismatic personalities than for their moral character.

 

  1. It is here argued that one of the Biblical king David’s failures as a leader was that he delegated and then ignored what was happening.

 

  1. Before acting, the servant-leader must know for sure what is best for his or her followers.

 

 

Fill-in-the-Blank Questions

 

  1. Ciulla argues that                                is simply “Machiavellianism for nonprofits.”

 

  1. Ciulla points out that the power of                                         leaders is overestimated when it comes to their actual effects on corporate performance.

 

  1. Machiavelli argues that there are two ways of contending:                                   and                            .

 

  1. Machiavelli argues that a leader should know how to use the                                    nature wisely.

 

  1.                             is the goal of every leader.

 

  1.         argues that “anyone who is really a true leader doesn’t by nature seek his own advantage, but that of his subjects.”

 

  1. Seeing oneself as a                                             means realizing that the ultimate purpose of one’s work is others and not oneself.

 

  1.         are people who express moral values that they do not hold and then act against them.

 

  1. Privileged access and control of resources are perquisites of                                                 that can be either used to lead effectively or abused for personal gain.

 

  1. Greenleaf describes the                                     , who sets out to meet the needs of others.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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