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Homework answers / question archive / 1)Simultaneously analyzing distinct subunits of information received by different areas of the brain is known as interposition

1)Simultaneously analyzing distinct subunits of information received by different areas of the brain is known as interposition

Psychology

1)Simultaneously analyzing distinct subunits of information received by different areas of the brain is known as

    1. interposition.
    2. perceptual adaptation.
    3. parallel processing.
    4. feature detection.

 

 

  1. The ability to simultaneously process the pitch, loudness, melody, and meaning of a song best illustrates
    1. relative luminance.
    2. accommodation.
    3. perceptual adaptation.
    4. parallel processing.

 

 

  1. The human ability to speedily recognize familiar objects best illustrates the value of
    1. stroboscopic movement.
    2. afterimages.
    3. retinal disparity.
    4. parallel processing.

 

 

  1. Certain stroke victims report seeing nothing when shown a series of sticks, yet they are able to correctly report whether the sticks are vertical or horizontal. This best illustrates
    1. relative luminance.
    2. the phi phenomenon.
    3. accommodation.
    4. blindsight.

 

 

  1. People who demonstrate blindsight have most likely suffered damage to their
    1. cornea.
    2. lens.
    3. fovea.
    4. visual cortex.

 

 

  1. Early in the twentieth century, a group of German psychologists noticed that people tend to organize a cluster of sensations into a(n)
    1. parallel process.
    2. monocular cue.
    3. afterimage.
    4. gestalt.

 

 

  1. A gestalt is best described as a(n)
    1. binocular cue.
    2. illusion.
    3. organized whole.
    4. linear perspective.

 

 

  1. Our shifting perceptions of a Necker cube best illustrate the importance of
    1. blindsight.
    2. retinal disparity.
    3. perceptual adaptation.
    4. top-down processing.

 

 

  1. The perception of an object as distinct from its surroundings is called
    1. linear perspective.
    2. perceptual constancy.
    3. figure-ground perception.
    4. interposition.

 

 

  1. Visually perceiving words as distinct from the surrounding white paper on which they are printed best illustrates
    1. retinal disparity.
    2. figure-ground perception.
    3. the phi phenomenon.
    4. perceptual adaptation.

 

 

  1. As the airplane descended for a landing, the pilot saw several beautiful islands that appeared to float in a vast expanse of blue ocean water. In this instance, the ocean is a
    1. figure.
    2. binocular cue.
    3. ground.
    4. perceptual adaptation.

 

 

  1. Figure is to ground as ________ is to ________.
    1. form; substance
    2. looking up; looking down
    3. sensation; perception
    4. a white cloud; blue sky

 

 

  1. The perceptual tendency to group together stimuli that are near each other is called
    1. interposition.
    2. perceptual constancy.
    3. proximity.
    4. closure.

 

 

  1. The organizational rules identified by Gestalt psychologists illustrate that
    1. perception is the same as sensation.
    2. we learn to perceive the world through experience.
    3. the perceived whole may exceed the sum of its parts.
    4. sensation has no effect on perception.

 

 

  1. Carmella, Jorge, and Gail were all sitting behind the same bowling lane, so Ruth perceived that they were all members of the same bowling team. This best illustrates the organizational principle of
    1. proximity.
    2. interposition.
    3. closure.
    4. continuity.

 

 

  1. The principles of continuity and closure best illustrate that
    1. sensations are organized into meaningful patterns.
    2. perception is the direct product of sensation.
    3. cultural experiences shape perception.
    4. visual information is especially likely to capture our attention.

 

 

  1. The perception of the letter “t” as two intersecting lines rather than as four nonintersecting lines illustrates the principle of
    1. linear perspective.
    2. proximity.
    3. closure.
    4. continuity.

 

 

  1. The perceptual tendency to fill in gaps in order to perceive disconnected parts as a whole object is called
    1. interposition.
    2. closure.
    3. continuity.
    4. proximity.

 

 

  1. Although a few keys on the piano were broken, Shana mentally filled in the missing notes of the familiar melodies. This best illustrates the principle of
    1. proximity.
    2. closure.
    3. blindsight.
    4. interposition.

 

 

  1. When hearing the words “eel is on the wagon,” you would likely perceive the first word as “wheel.” Given “eel is on the orange,” you would likely perceive the first word as “peel.” This context effect best illustrates the organizational principle of
    1. proximity.
    2. interposition.
    3. closure.
    4. accommodation.

 

 

  1. The ability to see objects in three dimensions is most essential for making judgments of
    1. continuity.
    2. distance.
    3. relative luminance.
    4. stroboscopic movement.

 

 

  1. When Kristy saw her mother and sister running toward her, she quickly recognized that her sister was running ahead of her mother. This best illustrates Kristy's capacity for
    1. retinal disparity.
    2. stroboscopic movement.
    3. depth perception.
    4. blindsight.

 

 

  1. The visual cliff is a laboratory device for testing ________ in infants.
    1. size constancy
    2. accommodation
    3. depth perception
    4. perceptual adaptation

 

 

  1. Infants who were exposed to the visual cliff
    1. tried to climb up the cliff if their mothers were at the top.
    2. gave no evidence that they could perceive depth.
    3. refused to cross over onto the glass over the cliff to their mothers.
    4. eagerly crossed to their mothers by means of the “bridge” provided.

 

 

  1. Retinal disparity is an important cue for
    1. perceiving color.
    2. shape constancy.
    3. perceiving distance.
    4. brightness constancy.

 

 

  1. Retinal disparity refers to the
    1. tendency to see parallel lines as coming together in the distance.
    2. tendency to see stimuli that are near each other as parts of a unified object.
    3. somewhat different images our two eyes receive of the same object.
    4. inability to distinguish figure from ground.

 

 

  1. Holding two index fingers in front of the eyes can create the perception of a floating finger sausage. This best illustrates the effect of
    1. relative height.
    2. retinal disparity.
    3. interposition.
    4. relative luminance.

 

 

  1. John has more difficulty hitting baseballs that are pitched to him than his classmates do because he was born blind in his right eye. His difficulty can best be attributed to his lack of the depth cue known as
    1. proximity.
    2. interposition.
    3. retinal disparity.
    4. linear perspective.

 

 

  1. Indicators of distance such as interposition and linear perspective are
    1. visual cliffs.
    2. feature detectors.
    3. monocular cues.
    4. cataracts.

 

 

  1. Relative height is a cue involving our perception of objects higher in our field of vision as
    1. brighter.
    2. farther away.
    3. hazier.
    4. smaller.

 

 

  1. If you stared at a house as you walked down a street, the trees in front of the house would appear to be moving
    1. in the opposite direction as you, and the trees behind the house would appear to be moving in the opposite direction as you.
    2. in the same direction as you, and the trees behind the house would appear to be moving in the opposite direction as you.
    3. in the same direction as you, and the trees behind the house would appear to be moving in the same direction as you.
    4. in the opposite direction as you, and the trees behind the house would appear to be moving in the same direction as you.

 

 

  1. If two objects are assumed to be the same size, the object that casts the smaller retinal image is perceived to be
    1. moving faster.
    2. less hazy.
    3. more distant.
    4. closer.

 

 

  1. As the farmer looked across her field, the parallel rows of young corn plants appeared to converge in the distance. This provided her with a distance cue known as
    1. proximity.
    2. linear perspective.
    3. closure.
    4. continuity.

 

 

  1. The monocular depth cue in which an object blocking another object is perceived as closer is
    1. interposition.
    2. relative height.
    3. continuity.
    4. linear perspective.

 

 

  1. Which of the following is a cue used by artists to convey depth on a flat canvas?
    1. proximity
    2. continuity
    3. interposition
    4. closure

 

 

  1. Our assumption that light typically comes from above us contributes most directly to the importance of ________ as a monocular cue for depth perception.
    1. interposition
    2. retinal disparity
    3. light and shadow
    4. linear perspective

 

 

  1. The steadily increasing size of the retinal image of an approaching object is especially important for perceiving the object's
    1. shape.
    2. motion.
    3. height.
    4. weight.

 

 

  1. The quick succession of briefly flashed images in a motion picture produces
    1. retinal disparity.
    2. blindsight.
    3. stroboscopic movement.
    4. linear perspective.

 

 

  1. The phi phenomenon refers to
    1. a binocular cue for perceiving depth.
    2. the perception of movement created by the successive blinking on and off of adjacent lights.
    3. the ability to adjust to an artificially displaced visual field.
    4. the tendency to fill in gaps to perceive disconnected parts as a whole object.

 

 

  1. The sequentially flashing Christmas tree lights appeared to generate pulsating waves of motion. This best illustrates
    1. relative motion.
    2. retinal disparity.
    3. the phi phenomenon.
    4. interposition.

 

 

  1. Perceiving objects as unchanging even as illumination and retinal images change is known as
    1. interposition.
    2. blindsight.
    3. perceptual constancy.
    4. the phi phenomenon.

 

 

  1. Our capacity for perceptual constancy even as illumination and retinal image change illustrates the importance of
    1. difference thresholds.
    2. stroboscopic movement.
    3. top-down processing.
    4. blindsight.

 

 

  1. Color constancy refers to the fact that
    1. light waves reflected by an object remain constant despite changes in lighting.
    2. objects are perceived to be the same color even if the light they reflect changes.
    3. the perceived color of an object has a constant relation to its brightness.
    4. the frequency of light waves is directly proportional to the light's wavelength.

 

 

  1. To experience color constancy, we should view things
    1. from very short distances.
    2. for long periods of time.
    3. under low levels of illumination.
    4. in relation to surrounding objects.

 

 

  1. Jody's horse looks just as black in the brilliant sunlight as it does in the dim light of the stable. This illustrates what is known as
    1. interposition.
    2. accommodation.
    3. brightness constancy.
    4. the phi phenomenon.

 

 

  1. Brightness constancy is most clearly facilitated by
    1. proximity.
    2. interposition.
    3. relative luminance.
    4. retinal disparity.

 

 

  1. The amount of light reflected by an object relative to the amount reflected by surrounding objects is called
    1. continuity.
    2. interposition.
    3. retinal disparity.
    4. relative luminance.

 

 

  1. Although college textbooks frequently cast a trapezoidal image on the retina, students typically perceive the books as rectangular objects. This illustrates the importance of
    1. size constancy.
    2. linear perspective.
    3. shape constancy.
    4. binocular cues.

 

 

  1. As the retinal image of a horse galloping toward you becomes larger, it is unlikely that the horse will appear to grow larger. This best illustrates the importance of
    1. relative luminance.
    2. size constancy.
    3. closure.
    4. relative motion.

 

 

  1. The perceived size of an object is most strongly influenced by that object's perceived
    1. shape.
    2. color.
    3. distance.
    4. motion.

 

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