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Homework answers / question archive / Chapter 5—Deciding Where Loyalties Lie, 1763-1776   MULTIPLE CHOICE       1)   Why did Charles Inglis oppose separation from the mother country? a

Chapter 5—Deciding Where Loyalties Lie, 1763-1776   MULTIPLE CHOICE       1)   Why did Charles Inglis oppose separation from the mother country? a

History

Chapter 5—Deciding Where Loyalties Lie, 1763-1776

 

MULTIPLE CHOICE

 

    1)   Why did Charles Inglis oppose separation from the mother country?

a.

He believed that colonialism would self-destruct.

b.

He urged colonists to wait for the dying out of the monarchy.

c.

He thought separation would aid England's rivals.

d.

He feared that confusion and violence would result.

 

 

 

     2.   Victory in the French and Indian War brought Britain all of the following spoils, EXCEPT

a.

new farmlands in the Ohio Valley.

b.

profitable fishing grounds off the coast of Newfoundland.

c.

the mainland of Canada.

d.

the French Caribbean sugar islands.

 

 

 

     3.   How did Indians respond to the influx of English settlers into their territory after 1763?

a.

They formed alliances among themselves and launched a series of attacks.

b.

They withdrew further west.

c.

They turned to their traditional allies, the French, for help.

d.

Most of them reluctantly signed new treaties with the English, ceding more land.

 

 

 

     4.   Colonists reacted to the Proclamation Line of 1763 by

a.

slaughtering Indians wholesale.

b.

bargaining for land in Canada.

c.

demanding cheaper land east of the line.

d.

moving west of the line anyway.

 

 

 

     5.   How did the British act toward dissident French-Canadians?

a.

The British allowed them to retain their fishing and fur-trading industries.

b.

The British granted them autonomy in cultural and religious life.

c.

The British sent in an army to enforce compliance with British laws.

d.

The British sent in clergy and tried to force them to convert to Anglicanism.

 

 

 

     6.   Grenville's American Revenue Act of 1764

a.

empowered custom officers to use blanket warrants against smugglers.

b.

raised revenue by requiring a stamp on all legal documents.

c.

lowered the tax on French sugar.

d.

created the vice admiralty courts.

 

 

 

 

 

     7.   Grenville moved smuggling trials from civil courts to vice-admiralty courts because

a.

the civil courts had too many cases.

b.

the harsh penalties handed down by civil courts drove up black market prices and actually increased smuggling.

c.

colonial smugglers found sympathetic juries in civil courts.

d.

rival factions in Parliament had control of judges in civil courts.

 

 

 

     8.   Who was hurt by the stamp tax?

a.

Only the rich

b.

Only the poor

c.

Northerners, but not southerners

d.

Americans of all walks of life

 

 

 

     9.   The attack on Thomas Hutchinson's house revealed that

a.

tax collectors weren't safe in the city of Boston.

b.

wealthy men had to watch their backs.

c.

protests weren't exclusively over British policies, but local issues as well.

d.

the revolution was inevitable.

 

 

 

   10.   In examining the Stamp Act, James Otis came to the conclusion that

a.

resisting the Stamp Act risked creating a rebellion he could not support.

b.

Parliament had overstepped its authority.

c.

the colonists should resist efforts by the British to grant colonial representation in Parliament.

d.

the time was ripe for revolution.

 

 

 

   11.   The debates over the principle of "no taxation without representation" focused on the question of whether

a.

any governmental body could legitimately tax Americans.

b.

it was appropriate for American colonial assemblies to collect taxes.

c.

the House of Commons could tax Americans.

d.

women and propertyless men should have the right to vote.

 

 

 

   12.   Patrick Henry briefly stirred the passion of his colleagues in the House of Burgesses when he suggested that

a.

the Stamp Act was evidence of the king's tyranny.

b.

British parliament was the source of tyranny.

c.

Englishmen were the enemies of Americans.

d.

Virginia send its own representatives to British Parliament.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   13.   The repeal of the Stamp Act resulted from

a.

the arguments of the Stamp Act Congress.

b.

hundreds of people being killed in rioting.

c.

a majority of Americans favoring independence from Britain.

d.

economic pressure.

 

 

 

   14.   Colonists celebrated the Stamp Act's repeal with

a.

calls for independence.

b.

burning the king in effigy.

c.

more protest against Parliament.

d.

public outpouring of loyalty to England.

 

 

 

   15.   The Declaratory Act

a.

announced a new tax on tea.

b.

asserted British authority to tax the colonies directly.

c.

declared the port of Boston closed.

d.

declared colonial assemblies dissolved.

 

 

 

   16.   The concept of "virtual representation" meant that

a.

the House of Commons represented all non-noble citizens in the empire whether or not they voted in elections.

b.

American assemblies were the only bodies that could tax Americans.

c.

members of American assemblies could designate their replacements.

d.

only true and honest men should be elected to office.

 

 

 

   17.   Which colonial group did NOT favor the nonimportation movement?

a.

Small merchants

b.

Large merchants

c.

Smugglers

d.

Artisans

 

 

 

   18.   Unlike any import taxes the colonies had ever seen, the Townshend Acts taxed

a.

goods manufactured in the colonies.

b.

colonial banks.

c.

products made within the British empire.

d.

slave labor.

 

 

 

   19.   What role did women's groups play in promoting colonial resistance?

a.

Since women were not permitted to participate in politics, they didn't do much.

b.

They refused to socialize with men who traded with the British.

c.

They spied on British soldiers and brought intelligence to male leaders.

d.

They produced an alternative to the factory-produced cloth Americans were boycotting.

 

 

 

   20.   When the Massachusetts Assembly refused to rescind its letter of protest, Governor Francis Bernard

a.

ordered its leaders arrested.

b.

dissolved it.

c.

did nothing, even though he had been ordered to take decisive actions.

d.

publicly announced that he agreed with the decision.

 

 

 

   21.   The Boston Massacre resulted from

a.

the success of the Boston Tea Party.

b.

a boundary dispute between colonists and British troops.

c.

the presence of British troops in Boston.

d.

the boycotting of British goods.

 

 

 

   22.   Edmund Burke's speech to the House of Commons indicates that he believed that

a.

a clash between the two sides was extremely likely.

b.

a firm, decisive response by the British government would end the troubles.

c.

he did not have a clear sense of where America was, let alone any understanding of the situation.

d.

both sides were in the wrong.

 

 

 

   23.   Which of the following best describes the Gaspée incident off the coast of Rhode Island in 1772?

a.

Overeager British customs officials gunned down a French smuggler on an American vessel.

b.

A British customs patrol boat ran aground in its pursuit of an American smuggler vessel and was set on fire by a band of angry colonists.

c.

The British learned about an early diplomatic effort of the colonists to gain French support for their revolutionary war for independence.

d.

The murder of a British customs officer on a French smuggler boat brought the wrath of the British Empire to the colonies.

 

 

 

   24.   The committees of correspondence

a.

organized a letter-writing campaign to the royal governors.

b.

exchanged information about questionable royal activities in the colonies.

c.

were a last-ditch attempt to promote friendly relations between Americans and people in Britain.

d.

examined American and British regulations to see if they were in harmony.

 

 

 

   25.   Parliament believed the colonists would accept the Tea Act because

a.

it would lower the price of tea.

b.

it confirmed the power of colonial assemblies to tax the colonists.

c.

allowed the Dutch to sell some tea in the colonies.

d.

it gave colonial merchants greater profits.

 

 

 

   26.   After the Boston Tea Party, the British

a.

broke diplomatic relations with Americans.

b.

arrested scores of American "agitators."

c.

reluctantly repealed the Tea Act.

d.

closed the port of Boston.

 

 

 

   27.   Americans objected to the Quebec Act because it seemed that

a.

at the same time the British were depriving them of their liberties, they were expanding the rights of French Catholics.

b.

the French were being invited to return to Canada.

c.

Parliament was making decisions about America without consulting them.

d.

it would lead to another war.

 

 

 

   28.   Why did Samuel Adams and radical artisans form the "solemn league and covenant"?

a.

To boycott British goods

b.

To employ a divide-and-conquer strategy

c.

To begin a letter of protest campaign

d.

To launch a slave rebellion

 

 

 

   29.   At the First Continental Congress in 1774 Jefferson argued that

a.

American colonists owed no loyalty to Britain whatsoever.

b.

the colonists owed allegiance to the nation's king, not to Parliament.

c.

the colonists owed allegiance to Parliament only.

d.

a Grand Council, elected by each colonial legislature, ought to share with Parliament the right to originate laws for the colonies.

 

 

 

   30.   The Declaration of Rights and Grievances

a.

declared that the colonists no longer accepted Parliament's authority.

b.

promised to enforce the Proclamation Line of 1763 in exchange for Parliament lifting the Intolerable Acts.

c.

accepted Parliament's right to regulate colonial commerce but not to tax the colonies directly.

d.

called for a national government for the colonies.

 

 

 

   31.   Colonists suspected of being loyal to Britain were

a.

executed.

b.

forced to swear oaths of support for the patriot cause.

c.

given time to change their minds.

d.

respected for their courage.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   32.   General Gage sent troops to Concord to

a.

arrest Samuel Adams and John Hancock.

b.

seize colonial weapons.

c.

Both of these choices

d.

None of these choices

 

 

 

   33.   The Olive Branch Petition

a.

offered to end armed resistance if the king would remove British troops and repeal the Intolerable Acts.

b.

declared loyalty to Parliament but not to the king.

c.

offered Parliament some authority over colonial assemblies.

d.

promised continued commercial relations with Britain in exchange for independence.

 

 

 

   34.   Thomas Paine's Common Sense

a.

was read only by a relatively small number of people.

b.

did not criticize the king, only his "wicked counselors."

c.

was written in the language of ordinary men and women.

d.

claimed that it would be foolhardy to declare independence without an army.

 

 

 

   35.   The rationale expressed for independence in the Declaration of Independence was based upon the notion of

a.

the consent of the governed.

b.

natural rights.

c.

the right to overthrow tyrannical government.

d.

All of these choices.

 

 

 

   36.   The Declaration of Independence

a.

asserted that our rights come to us from the governments we create.

b.

focused on the king's abuse of power.

c.

defended the rights of Englishmen.

d.

affirmed that all governmental power comes from God.

 

 

 

   37.   Which statement about Loyalists is accurate?

a.

They were so small in number as to be virtually insignificant.

b.

They were all part of the upper classes.

c.

They were much more likely to be from cities in the North than from rural areas in the South.

d.

Many of them were more afraid of a lower-class mob than of the tyranny of the king.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   38.   The British policy toward slavery during the revolution

a.

kept blacks in bondage to work as laborers for the British military.

b.

envisioned blacks as an important supply of soldiers.

c.

offered freedom to slaves who left their masters in the hope of disrupting colonial farming operations.

d.

required compensation for slaveowners whose slaves escaped.

 

 

 

   39.   How did the Indians respond to the conflict between the British and white Americans?

a.

Although some were neutral, many tribes decided that their rights would be most respected by the British.

b.

The Indians had been mistreated by the British so many times that most tribes supported the patriot side.

c.

The Indians backed the patriots.

d.

Most tribes were unaware of or uninterested in the conflicts among whites.

 

 

 

   40.   In writing The True Interest, Charles Inglis predicted a(n)

a.

British rout of the Americans in a war.

b.

American victory over England in a war.

c.

outbreak of global war in the event of a war for independence.

d.

compromise between the colonists and the British rather than a war.

 

 

 

ESSAY

 

   41.   What role did Indians play in the crisis that evolved between white Americans and the British?

 

   42.   Why did the colonists react so strongly against British legislation concerning the colonies following the French and Indian War?

 

   43.   Discuss the various resistance tactics used by the Americans against the British from 1773 to 1775. Were they effective? Why or why not?

 

   44.   How important were ordinary Americans in the resistance movement?

 

 

   45.   Describe the differing views among colonial leaders as to how to protest their grievances to Britain leading up to the Declaration of Independence.

 

   46.   What were the most effective ways of mobilizing people to support the resistance to British policies?

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