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Homework answers / question archive / The Perfect Porridge Paragraph Read each of the following paragraphs and check the appropriate porridge clipart image that best describes the paragraph

The Perfect Porridge Paragraph Read each of the following paragraphs and check the appropriate porridge clipart image that best describes the paragraph

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The Perfect Porridge Paragraph Read each of the following paragraphs and check the appropriate porridge clipart image that best describes the paragraph. HINT: The “just right” bowl of porridge should be awarded to the body paragraph that best blends summary (intended to help the reader understand context) and analysis (intended to prove the writer’s critical thinking ability). Points can be added or subtracted for correct grammar, punctuation, and citation too! Body Paragraph #1: In Mairs’ essay “Disability”, she uses examples from popular media to defend her claim effectively. One of her first examples summarizes the plot of a medical drama that tells the story of a young woman diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. After learning her diagnosis, she decides to travel to Kenya while she is still ablebodied enough to immerse herself in the travel experience. Before she is able to go, though, her doctor attempts to dissuade her, for he has fallen in love with and wants to protect her. Before she was able to leave, “she succumbed to his blandishments and fled the taxi into his manly protective embrace” (13). In another example, Mairs focuses on the portrayal of disabled individuals in advertisements. She had the opportunity to ask a local advertiser why disabled people were not featured in his ads, and he explained “‘We don’t want to give people the idea that our product is just for the handicapped’” (14). This conversation allows Mairs to showcase her humor and to cultivate a light-hearted tone, as she jokingly quips, “But tell me truly now: If you saw me pouring out puppy biscuits, would you think these kibbles were only for the puppies of the cripples? If you saw my blind niece ordering a Coke, would you switch to Pepsi lest you be struck sightless” (par. 4). Her humorous perspective allows the reader to invest in her argument. Thanks to her humor and examples, the reader learns how powerful media depictions can be in undermining or erasing the experience of the disabled. Body Paragraph #2: In Mairs’ essay Disability, she uses examples from popular media to defend her claim that handicapped people should be displayed in the media more often. One of her first examples summarizes the plot of a medical drama that tells the story of a young women diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. After learning her diagnosis, she decides to travel to Kenya while her body can still handle the trip. Before she is able to go, though, “she succumbed to his blandishments and fled the taxi into his manly protective embrace.” Another example focuses on advertisement. Mairs had the opportunity to ask a local advertiser why disabled people were not featured in his ads, and he explained ‘we don’t want to give people the idea that out product is just for the handicapped”. This is incredibly upsetting information. Body Paragraph #3: In Mairs’ essay “Disability,” she uses examples from popular media to defend her claim effectively. Two of her most impactful examples focus on how various media represent or erase disability. To start, she shares the plot of a medical drama episode focused on a young woman who learns she has multiple sclerosis. Before the disease hinders her ability to travel, she makes plans to visit Kenya. Outside the airport, though, her lovestruck doctor dissuades her, causing her to flee her “taxi into his manly protective embrace” (Mairs 13). For Mairs, this example helps her readers understand her perspective that simplistic media portrayals can be damaging to disabled people. Indeed, medical dramas like the one described tend to show one’s disability as all-consuming and requiring of another’s constant care. In a second example, Mairs focuses on the portrayal of disabled individuals in advertisements. Rather than describe a specific advertisement for readers, she shares a conversation she had with a local advertiser. When she asked him why disabled people were not featured in his ads, he explained, “‘We don’t want to give people the idea that our product is just for the handicapped’” (qtd. in Mairs 14). This example allows Mairs to expand her critique of the media to draw attention to the harm it does to able-bodied people as well, for they are denied the chance to see the ordinariness of disability and to recognize “that it [disability] might enter anybody’s life” (14). Thanks to her powerful examples, Mairs is able to build the foundation for her paper’s argument and to help readers visualize how the media minimize the disabled person’s experience, suggest disabled people cannot care for themselves, and mask the truth that anyone carries the potential to become disabled. A Quick Citation Drill: - Help Prof. Decker build the Work Cited page for his paper. Now, from previous class conversation, we have learned that The Brief Bedford Reader is an anthology and any essay inside is a selection. Use the Directory to MLA Works Cited Models in our Rules for Writers text on pages 448-449 to find the “One selection from an anthology or a collection” model, flip to the recommended page number, and work individually to build the Work Cited page below:

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