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Homework answers / question archive / CHAPTER 14: A New Birth of Freedom: The Civil War, 1861-1865   MULTIPLE CHOICE        1) The example of German immigrant Marcus Spiegel demonstrated that: a

CHAPTER 14: A New Birth of Freedom: The Civil War, 1861-1865   MULTIPLE CHOICE        1) The example of German immigrant Marcus Spiegel demonstrated that: a

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CHAPTER 14: A New Birth of Freedom: The Civil War, 1861-1865

 

MULTIPLE CHOICE

 

     1) The example of German immigrant Marcus Spiegel demonstrated that:

a.

freedom motivated the immigration of Irish immigrants, but German immigrants of the mid-nineteenth century came to the United States in pursuit of economic success.

b.

the significant Jewish population in the United States was ambivalent about the issues that caused the Civil War.

c.

the views of average Americans evolved considerably during the course of the Civil War.

d.

Democrats were unwilling to go to war with a Republican president in the White House.

e.

although Jews were few in number, their role at the Battle of Gettysburg made military heroes of many of them.

 

 

          

 

     2.   Among the Confederacy’s advantages during the Civil War was:

a.

that its rail network was more advanced than the Union’s.

b.

its large size, which made it more difficult for the Union to conquer.

c.

that the Lower South had long had significant manufacturing facilities.

d.

that its military-aged white male population was slightly larger than the Union’s.

e.

that so many of its men volunteered to fight that it never resorted to a draft.

 

 

                                

                                                           

 

     3.   What did fighting a defensive war mean for the Confederates?

a.

The Confederate soldiers could sleep in their own beds at night.

b.

It was a strategy that Robert E. Lee did not agree to use.

c.

Since the weapon technology was basically equal, it was an advantage for the Confederates.

d.

This strategy did not work because the Union used the same defensive tactics.

e.

The aggressive Union armies would put a quick end to the war.

 

 

          

 

 

     4.   Monitor and Merrimac were:

a.

ironclad ships.

b.

steam locomotives.

c.

battle sites in Virginia.

d.

nicknames of Generals Grant and Lee.

e.

names of rifles.

 

 

                                

 

 

     5.   What was the most important piece of technology during the Civil War?

a.

Primitive hand grenade.

d.

Rifle.

b.

Ironclad ship.

e.

Telegraph.

c.

Observation balloon.

 

 

 

                                

 

 

     6.   Approximately how many Union and Confederate soldiers died during the Civil War?

a.

110,000.

d.

750,000.

b.

245,000.

e.

988,000.

c.

440,000.

 

 

 

          

 

 

     7.   At the first Battle of Bull Run:

a.

spectators and politicians came to watch.

b.

the Union won a smashing victory.

c.

both sides suffered more casualties than they did in any other single day during the war.

d.

the Confederates swept northward and briefly captured Washington, D.C.

e.

General Grant made a name for himself.

 

 

                                

 

 

     8.   As a general, what was George McClellan’s biggest contribution to the Union’s ultimate victory?

a.

He molded the Army of the Potomac into an effective fighting force.

b.

He led the Union to a major victory at Gettysburg.

c.

He saved lives by limiting the amount of troops used during battles.

d.

His sizing up of Confederate forces before a battle.

e.

He devised a good strategy to win at Vicksburg.

 

 

          

 

 

     9.   The major Confederate army in the East, commanded by Robert E. Lee, was called the Army of:

a.

the Rappahannock.

d.

the Chesapeake.

b.

the Blue Ridge.

e.

Northern Virginia.

c.

Southern Maryland.

 

 

 

          

 

 

   10.   At Antietam:

a.

General Lee was successful and pushed north into Pennsylvania.

b.

General McClellan surrendered his troops.

c.

the nation suffered more casualties than on any other day in its history.

d.

the Union’s river fleet proved crucial to the outcome.

e.

Lincoln announced the Thirteenth Amendment.

 

 

          

 

   11.   During the first two years of the war, Union forces were generally:

a.

more successful in the West than in the East.

b.

ill-trained, which changed when General McClellan took over in 1863.

c.

successful in all regions in which the war took place.

d.

unable to take any territory held by the Confederates.

e.

more successful in the East than in the West.

 

 

          

 

 

   12.   During the early days of the war, the U.S. Congress adopted a resolution proposed by Senator John Crittenden of Kentucky that:

a.

drafted men into the Union army, the first such draft in U.S. history.

b.

called for the gradual emancipation of slaves throughout the nation.

c.

criticized the civil liberties policies of the Lincoln administration.

d.

affirmed that the Union had no intention of interfering with slavery.

e.

extended the Missouri Compromise line to the eastern border of California.

 

 

                                

 

   13.   Lincoln was hesitant to support abolition early in the war because he:

a.

did not believe slaves could be productive American citizens.

b.

owned slaves himself.

c.

feared losing the support of the slaveholding border states within the Union.

d.

did not want to support the policies of the Radical Republicans.

e.

promised during his 1860 campaign that he was against abolition.

 

 

                                

 

   14.   During the Civil War, the term “contraband camps” referred to:

a.

camps in which materials such as rifles and gunpowder were kept.

b.

camps of southern slaves who had escaped from their masters and entered Union lines.

c.

training grounds for the youthful musicians who played to raise the morale of the troops.

d.

holding areas for items seized by customs agents for failure to pay tariffs.

e.

places near battlefields where the Union army temporarily kept Confederate prisoners.

 

 

                                

 

   15.   Which Union general in Missouri decreed freedom to that state’s slaves in 1861, a year before Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation?

a.

George McClellan.

d.

William Sherman.

b.

John Frémont.

e.

Ulysses S. Grant.

c.

Phil Sheridan.

 

 

 

                                

 

   16.   During the first two years of his presidency, what was a facet of Abraham Lincoln’s slavery policy?

a.

He said slavery was the impetus for the Civil War.

b.

He experimented with the colonization of freed slaves near Haiti.

c.

He urged Union commanders to start emancipating slaves immediately.

d.

He said there should be no compensation of slaveowners in Union states like Missouri.

e.

He urged a constitutional amendment to abolish slavery immediately.

 

 

                                

 

   17.   Lincoln’s issuance of an emancipation proclamation:

a.

was delayed on the advice of General George McClellan.

b.

won universal support throughout the North.

c.

led to a strong Republican showing in the congressional and state elections of 1862.

d.

followed the narrow Union victory in the Battle of Antietam.

e.

led Great Britain to recognize the independence of the Confederate States of America.

 

 

          

 

   18.   What would have been a practical outcome of the Emancipation Proclamation?

a.

All Confederate slaves would be freed gradually.

b.

Slaveowners would be compensated for their property.

c.

It took away from the propaganda of the abolitionists.

d.

The freeing of slaves would weaken the Confederate war effort.

e.

It only affected slaves working on cotton plantations.

 

 

          

 

   19.   The Emancipation Proclamation of January 1, 1863:

a.

was declared unconstitutional by the U.S. Supreme Court later that year.

b.

did not apply to the border slave states that had not seceded.

c.

freed slaves throughout the United States.

d.

was very popular with voters associated with the Democratic Party.

e.

was cited by Tennessee as the reason it rejoined the Union in 1864.

 

 

          

                                                                           

   20.   After comparing the presidencies of Abraham Lincoln and Jefferson Davis, what conclusion can be made?

a.

Lincoln appeared more indecisive.

b.

Davis benefited from attending the military academy.

c.

Lincoln learned from his past experiences as a slaveholder.

d.

Lincoln was pragmatic in his decision-making.

e.

Davis did a better job connecting with his citizens.

 

 

                                

 

   21.   The last nation in the Western Hemisphere to abolish slavery was:

a.

the United States.

d.

Haiti.

b.

Cuba.

e.

Jamaica.

c.

Brazil.

 

 

 

                                

 

   22.   In what year did slavery officially end in the Western Hemisphere?

a.

1863.

d.

1880.

b.

1865.

e.

1888.

c.

1874.

 

 

 

                                

 

   23.   How would the service of African-American soldiers in the Civil War best be categorized?

a.

They were treated as equals.

b.

They were given the same responsibilities as white soldiers.

c.

Few African-American soldiers served, so it is difficult to judge.

d.

Many served, but they did not help in the Union war effort.

e.

They were treated unfairly.

 

 

                                

 

   24.   The 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Regiment is best known as:

a.

a regiment of free blacks who charged Fort Wagner, South Carolina.

b.

the “Irish Brigade,” because its members were born in Ireland.

c.

the regiment that forced Richmond’s surrender.

d.

a regiment that was fully integrated, with noncommissioned black and white soldiers fighting side-by-side.

e.

the first regiment to see battle in the war.

 

 

                                

 

   25.   During the Civil War, black soldiers:

a.

did nothing to dispel racial prejudice with their performance.

b.

were mostly northern-born free blacks.

c.

performed the same duties as white soldiers from the outset, but at lower pay.

d.

helped inspire Republicans to believe that emancipation also demanded equal rights before the law.

e.

were allowed into the Union army only in the last year of the war.

 

 

                                

                                                                           

   26.   Starting in 1863, why did Frederick Douglass believe that African-Americans should serve as soldiers in the Union army?

a.

They needed to take ownership of their freedom.

b.

They were better equipped physically to fight.

c.

They needed a paying job.

d.

It was the best way to gain revenge on slaveholders.

e.

They could work well as spies, infiltrating large plantations.

 

 

                                

 

   27.   Besides preserving the Union, how else has Lincoln’s legacy lived on in today’s America?

a.

Through an executive order, he gave ex-slaves the right to vote.

b.

He brought harmony between the races.

c.

He created the blueprint that rebuilt the South economically.

d.

He encouraged African-Americans to convert to Christianity.

e.

He overcame regional differences to build a new nation-state.

 

 

          

                                                                

   28.   Lincoln’s vision during the Civil War:

a.

was to build a nation-state similar to what Otto von Bismarck was building in Germany and to what Giuseppe Mazzini was building in Italy.

b.

was that the American nation embodied a set of universal ideals rooted in political democracy and human freedom.

c.

was essentially that of the Democratic Party: an activist federal government building up American industry.

d.

allowed for African-Americans to achieve freedom because they already lived in the United States but did not extend to immigrants.

e.

was best expressed in his words, “As He died to make men holy, let us die to make men free.”

 

 

          

 

   29.   Lincoln spoke of “a new birth of freedom” for the nation in his:

a.

first inaugural address.

b.

second inaugural address.

c.

Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation.

d.

Sanitary Commission speech.

e.

Gettysburg Address.

 

 

          

   30.   During the Civil War, northern Protestant ministers:

a.

usually preached sermons that emphasized the needlessness of the war.

b.

organized a major pacifist campaign to end the war by Christmas 1862.

c.

helped create a civic religion combining Christianity and patriotism.

d.

were generally opposed to the goals of the Lincoln administration.

e.

raised hundreds of thousands of dollars to assist Confederates to show that they loved their enemies.

 

 

          

 

   31.   With regard to civil liberties during the Civil War, President Lincoln:

a.

always let courts and judges have the final say.

b.

suspended the writ of habeas corpus.

c.

ordered most Democratic newspapers shut down.

d.

urged the impeachment of federal judges who opposed him.

e.

strictly followed the Ex parte Milligan decision rendered in 1866.

 

 

          

 

   32.   In the Ex parte Milligan case, the U.S. Supreme Court stated that:

a.

Milligan should be hanged for writing pro-Confederate editorials during the Civil War.

b.

secession was unconstitutional.

c.

accused persons must be tried before civil courts where there were open, rather than military, tribunals.

d.

a president could order the jailing of civilians for any reason whatsoever during wartime.

e.

Congress, not the president, has the power to suspend the writ of habeas corpus.

 

 

          

 

   33.   Economically, the Civil War led to:

a.

a decline in prosperity for the North and South alike.

b.

the emergence of a nation-state committed to national economic development.

c.

a tariff reduction to attract foreign goods to make up for the decline in domestic production.

d.

the creation of the Third Bank of the United States, despite opposition from old Jacksonian Democrats.

e.

the building of a transcontinental railroad, completely through private financing.

 

 

          

 

   34.   What did the Morrill Land Grant College Act establish?

a.

It helped create colleges.

b.

It gave free land to white settlers.

c.

It sped up the process of naturalization for immigrants.

d.

It allowed women the opportunity to apply to men’s colleges.

e.

It created government funding for railroads.

 

 

          

 

   35.   What resulted from the completion of the first transcontinental railroad?

a.

The Civil War ended sooner.

b.

Various Indian tribes sabotaged it by destroying several railroad junctions.

c.

Lincoln was the first president to travel across the country.

d.

The amount of time to travel across the country dramatically decreased.

e.

The South used parts of the line to transport troops.

 

 

                                

 

   36.   Colonel John Chivington is remembered for:

a.

becoming a martyr when tortured and killed by Sioux warriors.

b.

leading the cavalry charge that turned back a Confederate assault at Shiloh.

c.

his refusal to surrender his Confederate troops until weeks after Lee’s final surrender.

d.

organizing a band of pro-Union Creek Indians who fought bravely at Vicksburg.

e.

leading an attack that killed more than 150 Indian men, women, and children.

 

 

          

 

   37.   The Civil War proved to be disastrous for which noncombatants?

a.

Slaves in Maryland.

d.

Navajos.

b.

Slaves in South Carolina.

e.

Pacifist abolitionists.

c.

Iroquois.

 

 

 

                                

 

   38.   What happened to Cherokee slaveholders after the Civil War?

a.

They were slaughtered.

b.

They were forced to leave the United States.

c.

They were forced to give former slaves some of their land.

d.

They were forced to march to Oklahoma.

e.

They had land given to them by the federal government.

 

 

          

 

   39.   Captains of industry like steel magnate Andrew Carnegie and oil man John D. Rockefeller:

a.

began creating or consolidating their fortunes during the Civil War.

b.

benefited after the war from the respect their military service earned for them.

c.

became important advisers to President Lincoln.

d.

voluntarily provided important resources to the war effort.

e.

made millions bilking southerners who were buying war bonds.

 

 

                                

 

   40.   “Greenback” was a Civil War-era nickname for:

a.

sailors.

d.

paper money.

b.

draft dodgers.

e.

any Confederate soldier.

c.

members of the Irish Brigade.

 

 

 

          

 

   41.   What was a result of the expanding Union economy?

a.

The government borrowed great amounts of money from overseas.

b.

The protective tariff decreased, bringing with it free trade.

c.

The size and spending of the government increased tremendously.

d.

The Union could buy the freedom of many slaves in the Confederacy.

e.

Factory jobs decreased as professional jobs increased.

 

 

          

 

   42.   The U.S. Sanitary Commission:

a.

was the first major organization to be run entirely by women.

b.

raised money for the families of soldiers on both sides.

c.

coordinated war donations on the northern home front.

d.

was the nation’s first garbage collection agency.

e.

introduced the idea of germ theory to Civil War hospitals.

 

 

                                

 

   43.   During the Civil War, northern white women:

a.

staged “bread riots” in major cities to protest food shortages.

b.

began obtaining jobs as government clerks.

c.

were recruited to sell war bonds door-to-door.

d.

were allowed to accompany their husbands into battle if they did not have children.

e.

demonstrated outside the White House in favor of the Emancipation Proclamation.

 

 

          

 

   44.   Who lobbied for the United States to endorse the First Geneva Convention of 1864?

a.

Clara Barton.

d.

Bret Harte.

b.

Elizabeth Van Lew.

e.

Harriet Beecher Stowe.

c.

Zebulon Vance.

 

 

 

          

 

   45.   Copperheads were:

a.

what Republicans called northern opponents of the war.

b.

supporters of minting more copper coins to inflate the currency.

c.

advocates of creating the Third Bank of the United States.

d.

southern whites who opposed the Confederacy.

e.

the strongest supporters of emancipation.

 

 

          

 

   46.   What was the spark for a deadly riot in New York in 1863?

a.

Food shortages.

b.

A military draft.

c.

Peace negotiations with the South.

d.

Irish immigrants being asked not to serve.

e.

Opposition to the Thirteenth Amendment.

 

 

                                

 

   47.   By analyzing the New York City draft riots, what can be determined about the Civil War?

a.

The draft was efficient in signing up soldiers.

b.

The German immigrants were unhappiest about the war.

c.

The riots helped bring an end to the Civil War.

d.

The Civil War was a rich man’s war and a poor man’s fight.

e.

Opposition to the war existed only in the North.

 

 

 

 

   48.   Which of the following is true of Jefferson Davis and his governing?

a.

Although Davis had a poor prewar reputation as an orator, his speechmaking rose to new heights as the Confederacy’s president.

b.

He was stubborn and lacked political flexibility.

c.

He had Lincoln’s common touch, but the lack of newspapers in the South reduced his ability to communicate it.

d.

He strongly opposed centralizing authority in the Confederacy’s Richmond government.

e.

On more than one occasion, Davis, a West Point alumnus, led Confederate troops into battle.

 

 

                                

 

   49.   “King Cotton diplomacy” led Great Britain to:

a.

find new supplies of cotton outside the South.

b.

recognize the independence of the Confederate States of America.

c.

repudiate the Emancipation Proclamation.

d.

use its warships to break the Union blockade.

e.

stage multiple raids from Canada into the Upper Northwest.

 

 

          

 

   50.   What was ironic about the Confederate government?

a.

This new centralized government became stronger than the national government had been before the war.

b.

The leadership found little need for slaves doing fieldwork during the war.

c.

The Confederacy openly encouraged other countries to grow cotton.

d.

Jefferson Davis led troops into battle.

e.

The government wanted to end slavery in the Caribbean and then bring those slaves to the South.

 

 

                                

 

   51.   What caused economic problems for the Confederacy?

a.

Within the first year of the war, a majority of slaves refusing to do work.

b.

The abundance of food and cotton creating a buyer’s market.

c.

The issuing of paper money.

d.

An influx of immigrants creating high unemployment.

e.

Heavy taxing of large plantation owners.

 

 

          

 

   52.   When facing a food shortage on the Confederate home front, southern wives did what?

a.

Most times, they abandoned their family farms.

b.

They sold their children into slavery so that at least they would be fed.

c.

They petitioned the government in large numbers for relief.

d.

They forced the slaves to steal food from a neighbor.

e.

They fled to the North, since food was more plentiful there.

 

 

          

 

   53.   What role did slaves play with the Confederate army?

a.

Robert E. Lee asked for slave soldiers at the beginning of the war.

b.

Slaves willingly took up arms and served for the Confederates.

c.

The Confederate government never officially recruited slaves as soldiers.

d.

Numerous slaves worked as laborers for the Confederate military.

e.

Most slaveholders wanted their slaves to serve as soldiers for the Confederacy.

 

 

          

 

   54.   In July 1863, the Union won two key victories that are often identified as turning points in the war. These victories occurred at:

a.

Wilmington, North Carolina, and New Orleans, Louisiana.

b.

Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, and Vicksburg, Mississippi.

c.

Lexington, Kentucky, and Charleston, South Carolina.

d.

Antietam Creek, Maryland, and Appomattox Court House, Virginia.

e.

Fort Donelson, Tennessee, and Cold Harbor, Virginia.

 

 

          

 

   55.   What could be one possible reason that Robert E. Lee invaded the North in 1863?

a.

He hoped to spread slavery.

b.

He wanted to control some northern factories.

c.

He wanted revenge for Stonewall Jackson’s death.

d.

Gettysburg was a significant railroad junction.

e.

He hoped to deliver a knockout blow to the Union.

 

 

                                

                                                                                     

   56.   Why was Vicksburg essential?

a.

Capturing the city allowed the Union to control the Mississippi River.

b.

Stonewall Jackson lost his life here.

c.

It served as a gateway to the Appalachian Mountains.

d.

Before the Civil War, the port in this city had shipped more cotton than any other.

e.

It guarded the Gulf of Mexico.

 

 

          

 

   57.   The Union’s manpower advantage over the Confederacy:

a.

was short-lived once the Confederacy began using slaves as soldiers.

b.

proved essential for the success of Grant’s attrition strategy.

c.

was rather slight.

d.

although substantial, did not matter in determining the war’s outcome.

e.

existed only because the Union had lower draft requirements than the Confederacy.

 

 

                                

 

   58.   With the 1864 battles in Virginia (between the armies of Grant and Lee):

a.

the Union army was forced to retreat down the peninsula in defeat.

b.

Lee’s brutality earned him the nickname “the Butcher.”

c.

the Confederates launched the heroic but unsuccessful Pickett’s Charge.

d.

the Union army, despite high casualties, pressed forward in its campaign.

e.

Grant’s men decisively defeated Lee’s army, which forced the evacuation of Richmond.

 

 

          

 

   59.   Which September 1864 event helped Lincoln win reelection as president that November?

a.

Lee’s surrender at Appomattox Court House.

b.

The Confederate surrender of Savannah.

c.

Grant’s victory at Vicksburg.

d.

McClellan’s rout of the Confederates at Seven Pines.

e.

Sherman’s capture of Atlanta.

 

 

                                

 

   60.   What separated Grant from the other Union generals who commanded the Army of the Potomac?

a.

Grant was the only one who went to the U.S. military academy.

b.

The other generals were or had been slaveholders.

c.

Grant was willing to wage a war of attrition.

d.

The other generals had more respect and trust from Abraham Lincoln.

e.

Grant was not as aggressive on the battlefield as the other commanders.

 

 

          

 

   61.   The “Sea Island Experiment” refers to:

a.

northern reformers’ efforts to assist former slaves with the transition to freedom.

b.

the Confederacy’s trial use of slaves as soldiers along the South Carolina coast.

c.

a U.S. government plan to introduce advanced technology to southern farming in order to decrease the need for slaves.

d.

the unsuccessful effort of General Ulysses Grant to allow former slaves to run their own farms in Mississippi.

e.

the code name for the Confederate navy’s submarine-building program.

 

 

                                

 

   62.   In the middle of the war, what did Lincoln hope to accomplish with his Ten-Percent Plan of Reconstruction?

a.

He wanted to weaken the cause of the radical abolitionists.

b.

He wanted rich slaveowners to pay 10 percent of their family wealth to the federal government in return for amnesty.

c.

He hoped 10 percent of the southern slaves would be freed automatically in all of the Confederate states.

d.

He sought to expand slavery in Mississippi and lessen it in Missouri.

e.

He hoped to establish a functioning civilian government in Louisiana.

 

 

 

 

   63.   The Wade-Davis Bill in 1864:

a.

received strong support from congressional Democrats but not from Republicans.

b.

called for at least two-thirds of a southern state’s voters to take a loyalty oath.

c.

showed Radical Republicans’ frustration with Lincoln’s Reconstruction plan.

d.

was the model for Lincoln’s later Ten-Percent Plan.

e.

failed to receive sufficient votes in the Senate and therefore died.

 

 

                                

 

   64.   General Sherman marched from Atlanta to the sea in order to:

a.

link up with Grant’s army.

b.

engage Lee in battle.

c.

demoralize the South’s civilian population.

d.

secure Richmond for the Union.

e.

free Union prisoners at Andersonville.

 

 

          

 

   65.   The Thirteenth Amendment:

a.

abolished slavery throughout the United States.

b.

was strongly supported by Democrats in 1864.

c.

set up a gradual plan of emancipation.

d.

defined U.S. citizenship to include African-Americans.

e.

specifically gave black men the right to vote.

 

 

          

 

   66.   Lincoln’s second inaugural address:

a.

blamed the South for the war.

b.

described the Civil War as divine punishment.

c.

blamed the North for the war.

d.

proved to be his final speech.

e.

called for black suffrage.

 

 

                                

 

   67.   In his last speech, Lincoln said what regarding postwar policy?

a.

Democracy demanded that African-Americans should play leading roles in southern politics.

b.

Southern whites would never concede defeat, so Reconstruction must be mild.

c.

He would defer to Radical Republicans in Congress.

d.

There should be at least limited black suffrage.

e.

Large southern planters should be made to pay dearly for having caused the war.

 

 

          

 

   68.   How was Ulysses Grant received in Europe during his tour in the 1870s?

a.

He was regarded as a mediocre military leader.

b.

He was praised as a “Hero of Freedom.”

c.

He was heralded as greater than Lincoln.

d.

He was criticized widely for his “war of attrition.”

e.

He was booed by workers as a capitalist tool.

 

 

                                

 

   69.   Besides ending slavery, the Civil War had what result?

a.

The government ignored the rights of African-Americans.

b.

It increased the power of small landowning farmers and shopkeepers.

c.

Northern capitalists and industrialists came to dominate on the national scene, taking power away from the former southern slaveholder.

d.

It greatly expanded the powers of the presidency.

e.

It weakened the power of the federal government.

 

 

          

 

   70.   Frederick Douglass viewed the abolition of slavery as:

a.

not the end of the nation’s work, but the beginning of a new phase of it.

b.

the crowning achievement of his life.

c.

proof that the nation really did not suffer from racial prejudice.

d.

confirmation that Lincoln deserved to be remembered as a Christ-like martyr.

e.

an important step that must be followed by the colonization of freed slaves outside the United States.

 

 

 

 

MATCHING

 

TEST 1

 

Match the person or term with the with the correct description.

 

a.

1864 Democratic presidential candidate

b.

challenged Lincoln for the 1864 Republican nomination

c.

pushed for African-Americans to be Union soldiers

d.

American National Red Cross

e.

attacked peaceful Indian settlement

f.

president of the Confederacy

g.

land grants for colleges

h.

practiced a war of attrition

i.

surrendered to General Grant

j.

favored a Ten-Percent Plan of Reconstruction

k.

teacher on the Sea Islands

l.

marched through the South

 

 

     1.   Ulysses S. Grant

 

     2.   Jefferson Davis

 

     3.   Justin S. Morrill

 

     4.   George McClellan

 

     5.   Robert E. Lee

 

     6.   Abraham Lincoln

 

     7.   John Chivington

 

     8.   John Frémont

 

     9.   Laura Towne

 

   10.   William T. Sherman

 

   11.   Clara Barton

 

   12.   Frederick Douglass

 

       

 

TEST 2

 

Match the person or term with the with the correct description.

 

a.

escaped slaves

b.

single deadliest day of the war

c.

Richmond

d.

Union not to interfere with slavery

e.

surrender of the Confederacy

f.

Confederate trade policy

g.

Gettysburg

h.

another Trail of Tears

i.

freed slaves

j.

first major battle of war

k.

opponents of the war

l.

rehearsal for Reconstruction

 

 

   13.   Navajo’s Long Walk

 

   14.   Bull Run

 

   15.   Copperheads

 

   16.   King Cotton diplomacy

 

   17.   Antietam

 

   18.   Emancipation Proclamation

 

   19.   contrabands

 

   20.   Appomattox

 

   21.   Pickett’s Charge

 

   22.   Confederate capital

 

   23.   Crittenden Compromise

 

   24.   Sea Islands

 

TRUE/FALSE

 

     1.   On both sides, the outbreak of war stirred powerful feelings of patriotism.

 

 

 

 

     2.   Medical knowledge had made great strides in the first half of the nineteenth century; thus, few soldiers died from wounds, infections, or diseases during the Civil War.

 

          

 

 

     3.   A day after a battle, many Americans were able to read about it in their daily newspaper.

 

 

 

 

     4.   The Union naval blockade was very effective early in the war.

 

 

 

 

     5.   Abraham Lincoln realized that his armies had to capture the Confederate capital, Richmond, in order to win the war.

 

 

 

     6.   Since Robert E. Lee’s army did not retreat, the North could not claim Antietam as a victory.

 

 

 

 

     7.   Lincoln’s primary purpose in raising troops in 1861 to put down the southern rebellion was to restore the Union.

 

 

 

     8.   In the early days of the war, northern military commanders returned fugitive slaves to their owners.

 

 

 

     9.   The Emancipation Proclamation represented a turning point in Lincoln’s own thinking.

 

 

 

   10.   Fewer than 50,000 blacks served in the Union army during the war.

 

          

 

   11.   Some black Union soldiers captured by the Confederates faced execution.

 

 

 

   12.   The Union violated their citizens’ civil liberties during the war.

 

 

   13.   With the Union victory at Glorieta Pass, the Confederate attempt at extending slavery west of Texas ended.

 

 

 

   14.   During the Civil War, the Navajo were forced to leave their homes in the New Mexico Territory and then to live permanently in Oklahoma.

 

          

                                                                           

   15.   Lincoln raised the money to pay for the war mostly through an income tax.

 

                                

 

   16.   Women did factory and nursing jobs during the war.

 

 

 

   17.   The New York City draft riots, begun as an attempt to resist the draft, also included an assault on the city’s black population.

 

                                                         

   18.   The provision of the Union draft law allowing individuals to provide a substitute or buy their way out of the army caused widespread indignation.

 

 

 

   19.   King Cotton diplomacy was intended to promote economic self-sufficiency in the South and force England to intervene on the side of the Confederacy.

 

 

   20.   Desertion was not a major problem in the Confederate army as it was in the Union army.

 

 

 

   21.   Major General George Pickett led a charge, aptly known as Pickett’s Charge, during the Second Battle at Bull Run.

 

          

 

   22.   George McClellan ran for president in 1864, pledging to end the Civil War.

 

 

 

   23.   The Sea Islands experiment demonstrated how ex-slaves could be employed as wage earners, and educated.

 

 

   24.   In Lincoln’s Ten-Percent Plan, blacks played a prominent role in Reconstruction.

 

 

 

   25.   The Wade-Davis Bill was the Democrats’ proposed Reconstruction plan.

 

          

 

 

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