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Homework answers / question archive / Organizational culture (Connect, Perform) Culture makes organizations feel different from one another

Organizational culture (Connect, Perform) Culture makes organizations feel different from one another

Management

Organizational culture (Connect, Perform)

Culture makes organizations feel different from one another. Different companies, even companies in the same industry, just do things differently. You can experience this for yourself by going to two local supermarkets—one a part of a large chain and the other locally owned. Look around you. Does someone offer to help you when you walk in the door? Do the employees seem happier at one location compared to the other? Do people wear uniforms at one place but not at the other? All of these things can give you clues about the company’s culture.

In the following diagram, identify the levels of corporate culture.

  

A.Surface level  

 

 

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1 / 1

B.Unconscious assumptions and beliefs  

 

 

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0 / 1

C.Expressed values and beliefs  

 

 

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0 / 1

(Source: Image adapted from Chuck Williams. (n.d.). Management (7th ed.). Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning, 2013: 107)

Close Explanation

Explanation:

An organization’s culture is largely invisible. There is no way of walking into a company and immediately saying, “This company is committed to helping employees grow and develop.” But people who look carefully can see and hear signs of an organization’s culture everywhere. For example, employee uniforms and managers encouraging employees to find ways to stock shelves faster are signs of a supermarket chain that has a culture based on the assumption “Efficiency is the way to succeed.” A mom-and-pop store where the underlying assumption is “Our employees and customers are our family” would have very different artifacts.

  

Managers work in an internal environment, which includesculture  

 .

 

Points:

1 / 1

Close Explanation

Explanation:

The internal environment of the organization consists of the company’s management, employees, and culture. Competitors and suppliers are parts of the company’s specific environment.

Match the following examples to the element of culture that they represent.

Example

Element of Culture

At a local university, students talk about being able to retake an exam three times as a way of showing how committed the school is to helping them learn. Story  
 
At Aplia, Post-It® notes are used to create “idea boards” or “wallstorms,” which reflect the value Aplia places on brainstorming and creativity. Slogan  
 
Despite the fact that he is now retired, Costco employees still talk about how Jim Sinegal lives his principles of corporate responsibility. Not only did he spearhead Costco’s purchase of Rwandan coffee, he is now sponsoring a school where Rwandan women can learn how to run their own businesses. Hero  
 

Points:

0.67 / 1

Close Explanation

Explanation:

Example

Element of Culture

Explanation

At a local university, students talk about being able to retake an exam three times as a way of showing how committed the school is to helping them learn. Story When people share tales about things that have been done in the past, they are telling stories, such as the tale about students being able to retake an exam three times. These stories capture the essence of the firm’s vision and values by showing how people have lived them.
At Aplia, Post-It® notes are used to create “idea boards” or “wallstorms,” which reflect the value Aplia places on brainstorming and creativity. Artifact Artifacts such as Post-It® notes are the physical objects that represent an aspect of an organization’s culture.
Despite the fact that he is now retired, Costco employees still talk about how Jim Sinegal lives his principles of corporate responsibility. Not only did he spearhead Costco’s purchase of Rwandan coffee, he is now sponsoring a school where Rwandan women can learn how to run their own businesses. Hero When people hold others up as role models, they are using heroes such as Sinegal to embody an organization’s values. Heroes can be real or mythical, and their actions show others what is expected of them.

Source: N., S. (May 2, 2012.). Costco in the mist: Jim Sinegal on investing in Rwanda. The Motley Fool, April 12. Retrieved from http://beta.fool.com/hukgon/2012/04/04/costco-boeing-starbucks-sinegal-investing-rwanda/3341/

A company’s culture is also evident in its slogans and ceremonies. Slogans are sayings that capsulize key attitudes in a single phrase. For example, the slogans “Grasp the forces driving the change,” or “Wisdom. Applied.” are not just for advertising—they also tell employees what is expected of them in the organization. Ceremonies are ritualized activities that underscore what is important in an organization by giving it formal recognition. For example, around 4:00 PM on Friday afternoons, foam darts fly around the office at Aplia. This ceremony celebrates the spirit of play that is just as important as work in the Aplia culture.

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