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Homework answers / question archive / Film Analysis Paper Guidelines The film analysis papers, are essentially identical in description

Film Analysis Paper Guidelines The film analysis papers, are essentially identical in description

Psychology

Film Analysis Paper Guidelines
The film analysis papers, are essentially identical in description. In each case, you are to compose a thesis paper that analyzes a single element in one film, and builds it arguments based upon brief examples from the film. This thesis paper format is very common in college literature, film, media, social science. The idea is to choose a film you watched that is based upon a thesis, which is a single premise, stated in your first two or three sentences which lays out the point of view which you intend to argue in support of throughout the paper. The thesis is the reason you are writing the paper, which is an attempt to inform and convince your reader that this premise is based upon facts gathered from the text you are analyzing, in this case a film. Your thesis statement lets your reader know what to expect from the paper, and lays out the case you intend to make in support of your premise.
Your paper's title, the first thing that your reader will see, should reflect your thesis. If you are writing a paper on Citizen Kane for example, your paper's title should NOT BE Citizen Kane. That is the film's title. Your title should reflect the intent of your argument, your thesis. So, a paper on Citizen Kane that focuses on the film as a reflection of the impact of the loss of a mother's love on Kane's emotional development, might be called A Mother's Love: a Commodity Money Can't Buy.
The outline for a thesis paper would follow this structure, but the paper itself should not be broken into bullets:
Thesis statement- Lays out your premise clearly in one or two simple sentences.
Argument 1- Start with your strongest evidence from the film that supports your premise.Example 1- A VERY BRIEF description of the scene that you are using as evidence of your first argument.Example 2- A VERY BRIEF description of the second scene that you are using as evidence of your first argument.Argument 2- Continue, using your next strongest supporting argument.Example 1- A VERY BRIEF description of the scene that you are using as evidence of your second argument.Example 2- A VERY BRIEF description of the second scene that you are using as evidence of your second argument.Argument 3- Continue, using your next strongest supporting argument.Example 1- A VERY BRIEF description of the scene that you are using as evidence of your third argument.Example 2- A VERY BRIEF description of the second scene that you are using as evidence of your third argument.Conclusion- Close your paper by re-asserting your thesis, bringing your arguments back to your original thesis. argue the thesis persuasively using frequent brief examples, and conclude by confidently asserting that you have made your case. analyze data and think critically, and then express these ideas in writing.
Here are some other things to avoid-
Laundry List- Do not start with one idea or thesis and switch in the middle to another thesis, or multiple theses. Stick to your thesis, support it with arguments and examples and drive on straight to your conclusion.
Opinion\Homage- You can express your opinion in the course of your analysis and your arguments, but simply trashing or adoring a film is not analysis. One type of opinion paper is an homage, which is based upon arguing that the film is great or a classic. As your reader, tell me something new and interesting that you uncovered in your close viewing and analysis of the film.
Review- This is not a thumbs-up or thumbs-down process. See the prior item.
Plot Summary- Do not simply recount what happens in the film. You are to assume that your reader has seen it. it's a 3 page paper

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